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Ask Dr. Universe: Why do volcanoes ‘die?’
August 9, 2016

volcanoPULLMAN, Wash. – Each volcano’s life is a little different. Many of them are born when big chunks of the Earth’s crust, or tectonic plates, collide or move away from each other. The moving plates force hot, liquid rock, or magma, to rise up from deep within the Earth.

Ask Dr. Universe: What happens under a volcano?
September 8, 2015

Dr-Universe-230PULLMAN, Wash. – This question takes us on a journey deep into the Earth. Figuratively speaking, of course. It’s really hot under Earth’s surface. It’s so hot it can melt rock. This melted rock is known as magma. And anything that erupts magma is a volcano.

KWSU-TV covered Mount St. Helens’ impact at WSU
May 18, 2015

TerrellKWSUFilmPULLMAN, Wash. – May 18, 2015 marks the 35th anniversary of the eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington state. The ash cloud moved across the northwest, directly impacting Washington State University for weeks.

Rock Doc: Giving warning of volcano eruptions
April 1, 2014

By E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

peters-e-k-2010-80PULLMAN, Wash. – I was living in eastern Washington in May 1980 when Mount St. Helens erupted after a massive landslide triggered by a magnitude 5.1 earthquake.

Rock Doc: A step forward in predicting volcanic eruptions
February 25, 2014

By E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Peters-e-k-2010-80PULLMAN, Wash. – There are two main things most people would like to know about particular volcanoes: when is the next eruption and how big will it be? Scientists in Iceland have taken a step forward in monitoring volcanoes to best predict when they will erupt and the size of the eruptions.

Medieval monks’ records, volcanoes and climate
July 30, 2013

PULLMAN, Wash. – Ireland enjoys a mild and stable climate. But even in Ireland there are years that stand out as unusual.

 

Recently a team of researchers led by Harvard University’s Francis Ludlow announced results of a study of Ireland’s climate based on the Irish Annals, a body of writings containing more than 40,000 entries.

 

Part of the Irish Annals.

The annals record events from 431 to 1649 A.D. During the medieval period they were written by monks. From the 1200s some entries were written by historians of the wealthy and aristocratic families of the period. Toward … » More …