Skip to main content Skip to navigation
Pink snow mold destruction discovered in area wheat fields
March 28, 2017

By Linda Weiford, WSU News

PULLMAN, Wash. – Damage caused by snow mold in some eastern Washington wheat fields has surprised a Washington State University plant expert who has studied the fungus for nearly four decades.

Researchers tackle impact of climate change on plants
February 6, 2017

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers are undertaking an industrious investigation into the effects of global warming on plants. Making the effort possible is a fully automated “plant hotel” that can analyze up to 6,000 seedlings in a single experiment.

May 21: ‘Fungi’ first on new Science Pub menu
May 6, 2015

fungiPULLMAN, Wash. – Growing, hunting and preserving edible mushrooms will be discussed by two Washington State University researchers at the inaugural Science Pub 7- 9 p.m. Thursday, May 21, at Paradise Creek Brewery downtown.

Award furthers international science collaborations
November 8, 2013

Pappu-H-2013-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Scientist Hanu Pappu recently was honored for his scholarship and international stature in agricultural research with an award that facilitates travel to India to interact and exchange ideas with researchers there.

Murray expands teaching to include extension audiences
September 20, 2013

MurrayPULLMAN, Wash. – Timothy Murray, professor of plant pathology, is growing his job. With new responsibilities as Washington State University Extension plant pathologist, he will divide his time between research (70 percent) and extension (30 percent).

Reducing costly fruit rot
April 1, 2009

Xiao (Photo by Brian Charles Clark)

The old saying about one bad apple spoiling the whole bunch is based on a real concern. For Washington’s tree fruit industry, postharvest rot of fruit in storage costs the industry millions of dollars of losses annually.

 

Chang-Lin Xiao, an associate professor of plant pathology and extension specialist at the WSU Tree Fruit Research and Extension Center in Wenatchee, has discovered three previously unknown fungal pathogens in the United States that cause apples and pears to rot in storage.

 

Two were the first reports of the pathogens in … » More …

Grad student selected as APS Student Fellow
February 3, 2009

PULLMAN — Olufemi J. Alabi, a doctoral graduate student in WSU’s plant pathology department, has been selected as a Student Fellow by the American Phytopathological Society.

Alabi, a native of Nigeria, will receive an expense-paid trip to Washington, D.C., in March to participate in a national summit on The Future of Education and Related Disciplines, organized by the APS Committee on the Future of Plant Pathology Education. He was nominated by his major professor, Naidu Rayapati, assistant professor of plant pathology. Rayapati is a grape virologist at the WSU Prosser Irrigated Agriculture Research and Extension Center.

“Femi is studious and inquisitive and has the ability … » More …

Enthusiastic for his vocation
March 17, 2006

In 44 years of work, Jack Rogers has authored or co-authored more than 196 journal articles, won numerous awards and chaired the Department of Plant Pathology for 13 years — among many other accomplishments. It is no surprise, then, that Rogers will be honored March 24 with one of WSU’s highest honors, the Eminent Faculty Award.“I was a Ph.D. student during the ‘golden era’ of employment for college professors,” said Rogers. “I was in no hurry to finish and, had I been left to my own devices, I probably would have gone south. I (now) would rather be here; I just didn’t know it at … » More …