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Grazing among grains yields ecological, economic benefits
February 23, 2015

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Wachter-80PULLMAN, Wash. – You generally don’t find livestock among the hills in the Palouse region of eastern Washington where grain is grown. But wheat farmers Eric and Sheryl Zakarison are changing that – and making a profit.

June 25: Grains field day stars heirloom wheat variety
May 14, 2014

By Cathy McKenzie, WSU Mount Vernon

grains-170MOUNT VERNON, Wash. – New varieties of wheat adapted for the mild marine climate of the Pacific Northwest will be featured at Small Grains Field Day 3-6 p.m. Wednesday, June 25, at Washington State University Mount Vernon.

‘Culture of the Land’ connects teachers to local research
May 1, 2014

By Cathy McKenzie, WSU Mount Vernon

wheat-field-80MOUNT VERNON, Wash. – Educators and students from six area school districts recently engaged in hands-on activities that will help them integrate science curricula and collaborate with each other. The “Culture of the Land” workshop at Washington State University Mount Vernon focused on local grains and bread making.

San Francisco baker to savor, share Northwest grain flavors
March 19, 2014

By Cathy McKenzie, WSU Mount Vernon

Tartine-cover-120MOUNT VERNON, Wash. – Chad Robertson, award-winning baker and co-owner of San Francisco’s Tartine Bakery and Bar Tartine, will explore new flavors as he tests Northwest-grown whole grains March 27-29 in the bread lab at Washington State University’s Northwestern Washington Research and Extension Center.

Student identifies key issues for national ag forum
February 12, 2014

keiko-tuttle-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Keiko Tuttle believes the biggest challenge agriculture will face in the next five years centers around a food source that makes up 70 percent of the human diet: cereal grains.

Murray expands teaching to include extension audiences
September 20, 2013

MurrayPULLMAN, Wash. – Timothy Murray, professor of plant pathology, is growing his job. With new responsibilities as Washington State University Extension plant pathologist, he will divide his time between research (70 percent) and extension (30 percent).