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WSU News Africa

Vaccinating increases family wealth, girls’ education

By Marcia Hill Gossard, College of Veterinary Medicine

PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University-led research team found households in rural Africa that vaccinate their cattle for East Coast fever increased their income and spent the additional money on food and education. Researchers also found that when fewer cattle died from the fever, girls were more likely to attend secondary school. » More …

Rabies vaccine found effective even after warm storage

By Marcia Hill Gossard, College of Veterinary Medicine

felix-lankester-webPULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University-led research team determined rabies vaccines stored at warmer temperatures still protect against the disease in dogs. » More …

WSU part of WHO plan for eliminating human rabies

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By Charlie Powell, College of Veterinary Medicine

PULLMAN, Wash. – The Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health at Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is a vital link in the framework announced today for elimination of human rabies worldwide by 2030. » More …

Exploring fashion, fit for African women of all sizes

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By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Attractive, comfortable clothing that fits a range of body sizes isn’t just an American desire – it’s global. A Washington State University researcher is exploring ways for African women of all sizes and shapes to look and feel good in modern fashions. » More …

Cattle killer: two parasites are better than one

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PULLMAN, WASH. – When calves are infected by two parasite species at the same time, one parasite renders the other far less deadly, according to a new study published in the journal of Science Advances. » More …

Tiny parasite, big disease: 22 years since fatal outbreak

By Linda Weiford, WSU News

crypto-from-CDC-200PULLMAN, Wash. – Twenty-two years ago this month, residents of Milwaukee started falling ill with nausea, diarrhea and abdominal cramps. At first, a highly contagious intestinal virus was blamed. But as symptoms struck tens of thousands of people – closing schools and businesses and nearly bringing the city to a standstill – health officials discovered the culprit: a tiny, pink-colored parasite. » More …

Partnership boosts east Africa, WSU ed, research opportunities

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Photo by Josiah Nombo

PULLMAN, Wash. – “A center for all of east Africa,” is how Jerman Rose describes the Nelson Mandela African Institute of Science and Technology (NM-AIST) in Arusha, Tanzania. It is central for expanding research and education in Africa as well as attracting Washington State University students to study and learn. » More …