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WSU News Africa

Engineering students design technology for African communities

aquaponics testingBy Maegan Murray, WSU Tri-Cities

RICHLAND, Wash. – Three teams of engineering students at WSU Tri-Cities designed technological advancements that will address challenges pertaining to farming, education and agricultural business in rural communities in Africa. » More …

Research addresses health impacts of contaminated water

WSU Vancouver graduate student Stephanie Gardiner, second from right, and an RN from the Holy Innocents Children’s Hospital in Mbarara, right, visit with patients in a field clinic in Kakoma, Uganda.

From Northwest Crimson & Gray, WSU Vancouver

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Helping get a hospital built in Uganda was an important step for Anita Hunter. But it was just the first step. » More …

Africa honors young scientist for infectious disease work

PULLMAN, Wash. – The African Academy of Sciences (AAS) this week recognized Washington State University’s Thumbi Mwangi as one of 22 early career scientists selected to be affiliates through 2021. » More …

WSU looks for practices to thwart antimicrobial resistance

WSU postdoctoral fellow Mark Caudell with Imani Kanuga, a Maasai leader in Nadonjukin Village, Tanzania.

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – The death last year of a woman in Reno, Nev., from an infection resistant to every type of antibiotic available in the U.S. highlights how serious the threat of antimicrobial resistance has become. » More …

Vaccinating increases family wealth, girls’ education

By Marcia Hill Gossard, College of Veterinary Medicine

PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University-led research team found households in rural Africa that vaccinate their cattle for East Coast fever increased their income and spent the additional money on food and education. Researchers also found that when fewer cattle died from the fever, girls were more likely to attend secondary school. » More …

Rabies vaccine found effective even after warm storage

By Marcia Hill Gossard, College of Veterinary Medicine

felix-lankester-webPULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University-led research team determined rabies vaccines stored at warmer temperatures still protect against the disease in dogs. » More …

WSU part of WHO plan for eliminating human rabies

Africa-dog-vaccination-research

By Charlie Powell, College of Veterinary Medicine

PULLMAN, Wash. – The Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health at Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is a vital link in the framework announced today for elimination of human rabies worldwide by 2030. » More …

Exploring fashion, fit for African women of all sizes

Design-collection-web

By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Attractive, comfortable clothing that fits a range of body sizes isn’t just an American desire – it’s global. A Washington State University researcher is exploring ways for African women of all sizes and shapes to look and feel good in modern fashions. » More …

Cattle killer: two parasites are better than one

Thumbi-80

PULLMAN, WASH. – When calves are infected by two parasite species at the same time, one parasite renders the other far less deadly, according to a new study published in the journal of Science Advances. » More …

Tiny parasite, big disease: 22 years since fatal outbreak

By Linda Weiford, WSU News

crypto-from-CDC-200PULLMAN, Wash. – Twenty-two years ago this month, residents of Milwaukee started falling ill with nausea, diarrhea and abdominal cramps. At first, a highly contagious intestinal virus was blamed. But as symptoms struck tens of thousands of people – closing schools and businesses and nearly bringing the city to a standstill – health officials discovered the culprit: a tiny, pink-colored parasite. » More …