Skip to main content Skip to navigation
Researchers link climate changes, Pueblo social disruption
April 1, 2016

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

PULLMAN, Wash. – The heavily studied yet largely unexplained disappearance of ancestral Pueblo people from southwest Colorado is “the most vexing and persistent question in Southwestern archaeology,” according to the New York Times.

But it’s not all that unique, say Washington State University scientists.

April 8-14 Humanities Week: Human impact on nature
March 28, 2016

By Adrian Aumen, College of Arts & Sciences

McKibbenPULLMAN, Wash. – The effects of human activities on the natural world will be explored in four free, public events during Humanities Week 2016 at Washington State University April 8-14.

May 22-25 conference: Plant and Microbe Adaptation to Cold
March 21, 2016

coldSEATTLE – Improving global food security and agricultural sustainability, with emphasis on the impact of climate change, is the theme of the 2016 Plant and Microbe Adaptation to Cold conference to be held May 22-25 in downtown Seattle.

Researchers grow cyberforests to predict climate change
February 24, 2016

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

VANCOUVER, Wash. – It can take Mother Nature 1,000 years to grow a forest. But Nikolay Strigul, assistant professor of mathematics and statistics at Washington State University Vancouver, can grow one on a computer in three weeks.

Jan. 26: How to prepare for wildfires, climate change
January 19, 2016

GoldmarkPULLMAN, Wash. – Effective responses to extreme wildfire seasons caused by climate change will be explored by Peter Goldmark, the state commissioner of public lands, in a free talk at 2 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 26, in the CUB junior ballroom at Washington State University. A reception will be at 1:30 p.m.

Study: Climate change rapidly warming world’s lakes
December 16, 2015

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

stephanie-hampton-80SAN FRANCISCO – Climate change is rapidly warming lakes around the world, threatening freshwater supplies and ecosystems, according to a study spanning six continents.

Seeking new sorghum, the ‘camel of crops,’ for biofuels
October 27, 2015

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

grant-writing-cousinsPULLMAN, Wash. – A trend of dry summers and low snowpack in coming years is expected to pose challenges for Washington farmers, especially those working marginal lands without access to ample irrigation.

Researchers look into a future life indoors
July 23, 2015

Lamb-BPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers will evaluate a dozen local homes as part of a national study on climate change’s effects on future indoor air quality.

Nursing prof a White House climate change panelist
June 29, 2015

By Alli Benjamin, College of Nursing

ButterfieldSPOKANE, Wash. – An army of interprofessional healthcare providers could help “green” healthcare and health systems nationwide, a Washington State University professor told the White House Summit on Climate Change and Health last week in Washington, D.C.

Study: How environment may have affected ancient societies
June 1, 2015

ancient-DNA-from-Photos-dot-comPULLMAN, Wash. – A new study in PLOS ONE shows for the first time that epigenetic marks on DNA can be detected in a large number of ancient human remains. This could improve understanding about the effects of famine and disease in the ancient world.