Skip to main content Skip to navigation
WSU News antibiotics

Africa to Leeds to WSU: Grad student pursues infectious diseases solutions

Sylvia OmuloBy Cheryl Reed, director of communication, WSU Graduate School

PULLMAN, Wash. – Recent news reports have focused public attention on the alarming threat of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections in U.S. hospitals. But the threat is truly global. » More …

March 21: Symphony of soil signals protects wheat health

By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – High-tech equipment that will help scientists improve wheat health will be introduced to the public at 9 a.m. Tuesday, March 21, at the Biotechnology-Life Sciences Building (BLS) room 402 at Washington State University. » More …

Rock Doc: What antibiotics might be doing to us

By E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

peters-e-k-2010-80PULLMAN, Wash. – It’s astonishing to think about, but when my grandfather was born one in five children didn’t live to see their fifth birthday, in large part due to endemic and epidemic diseases. Today that’s all changed. » More …

Antibiotic resistant infection? Yes, you

By Linda Weiford, WSU News

Antibiotic-resistance-170PULLMAN, Wash. – Let’s say you’re in a locker room after completing a workout. You grab a towel on the bench before realizing it belongs to someone else. Unknown to you, the person who just used the towel left behind some lingering Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, commonly known as “staph.” The organism was spread to that person’s hands after rubbing an infected hair follicle on his inner thigh. » More …

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria: Who is winning the battle?

Physicians and clinicians face an ongoing challenge: to keep up with increasingly stubborn, resistant bacteria that cause significant infections. The more exposure bacteria have to our available antibiotics, the higher their chances of evolution into a resistant form, with serious effects on medical care.The heavy use of antibiotics, from hand soap ingredients to prescriptions, for conditions that won’t even respond to an antibiotic is fostering the proliferation of these heavy-duty bugs. Over the past 10 years, the number of resistant bacteria has proliferated at an alarming rate.One mechanism of response is to reduce the overuse of antibiotics in general — something we can all help … » More …