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WSU News chemistry

Chemists make major strides in organic semiconductors

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University chemists have created new materials that pave the way for the development of inexpensive solar cells. Their work has been recognized as one of the most influential studies published in the Journal of Materials Chemistry in 2016. » More …

Ask Dr. Universe: What is slime and how can I make it?

PULLMAN, Wash. – Our world is full of slime makers. Slugs and snails leave behind gooey trails. Bacteria can create layers of slippery slime in water pipes. Even your body makes its own kind of slime. In our joints, we have slime that helps protect our bones. » More …

Student represents U.S. at sustainable chemistry school

By Maegan Murray, WSU Tri-Cities

lei-zhu-80-webRICHLAND, Wash. – A doctoral student at Washington State University Tri-Cities is one of 15 worldwide, and the only U.S. student, selected to participate in a recent week-long school in Germany about developing safe, reliable chemicals in a sustainable way. » More …

Illuminating sulfides’ roles in the body

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

Ming-Xian-webPULLMAN, Wash. – For the first time, researchers at Washington State University have created an injectable compound or “probe” that illuminates hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen polysulfides in different colors when they are present in cells. » More …

June 17-19: WSU hosts Northwest Crystallography Workshop

Keith-DunkerPULLMAN, Wash. – Drug discovery, crystal growth, environmental science and biofuels are some of the research topics that will be presented when Washington State University hosts the Northwest Crystallography Workshop June 17-19 at the Smith CUE. » More …

WSU Tri-Cities students learn to repurpose wine waste

By Maegan Murray, WSU Tri-Cities

mixing-compost-at-wine-centerRICHLAND, Wash. – Students in linked biology and chemistry courses worked with the Wine Science Center this semester to test “recipes” for composting wine pomace – the grape skins, stems and seeds left over from winemaking. The Washington State University Tri-Cities classes will assess and compare results in the next few weeks. » More …

Immobilizing nuclear waste the focus of WSU research

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

WallRICHLAND, Wash. – New research at Washington State University could help in the design of long-term nuclear waste storage facilities and make it easier to clean already contaminated areas. » More …

$1.5M grant helps turn chemical weapon into medical marvel

By Rebecca E. Phillips, University Communications

Xian-green-tube-130PULLMAN, Wash. – A middle-aged man is stricken by a heart attack and crumples to the floor. But when paramedics arrive, they skip the oxygen and instead administer a bit of toxic gas that puts the patient into a protective state of “hibernation.” Later, fully recovered in the hospital, the man’s heart shows little sign of damage. » More …