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WSU News Health Sciences

Rock Doc column: Have a cup of joe to help your eyes?

By E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

petersPULLMAN, Wash. – My day starts with coffee. I’m too cheap to buy it by the cup from baristas, so I just brew my own Folgers by the pot. I have a cup or two as I settle into work each morning and another cup – sometimes two – in the early afternoon. That may not be wise for a chronic insomniac like myself, but it’s a lifelong habit that at this point would be quite tough to break.  » More …

Rock Doc: What antibiotics might be doing to us

By E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

peters-e-k-2010-80PULLMAN, Wash. – It’s astonishing to think about, but when my grandfather was born one in five children didn’t live to see their fifth birthday, in large part due to endemic and epidemic diseases. Today that’s all changed. » More …

Leading hypothesis ruled out for miscarriage, birth defects

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Rowsey-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University reproductive biologists have ruled out one of the leading thoughts on why older women have an increased risk of miscarriages and children with birth defects. » More …

Research: Women more sensitive to, affected by marijuana

By Nicholas Deshais, Washington State Magazine

Rebecca-Craft-80PULLMAN, Wash. – After decades of researching gender differences in the effects of drugs, Rebecca Craft has found that females using marijuana are likelier than men to become dependent on the drug and suffer more severe withdrawals. » More …

Rock Doc: Designing healthier snack foods with new wheat

By E. Kirsten Peters, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

peters-e-k-2010-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Most of us don’t spend a lot of time cooking from scratch. What’s known as processed foods – everything from snacks to boxed dinners – makes up a great deal of what most Americans eat. Indeed, the majority of what most of us eat is processed to one degree or another. » More …

Ancient baby boom holds a lesson in over-population

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Koehler-80PULLMAN, Wash.—Washington State University researchers have sketched out one of the greatest baby booms in North American history, a centuries-long “growth blip” among southwestern Native Americans between 500 and 1300 A.D. » More …

Bile-farmed bears’ hearts ‘not normal,’ says WSU researcher

By Linda Weiford, WSU News

moon-bear-80PULLMAN, Wash. – A veterinary cardiologist from Washington State University has just returned from an overseas research trip to help determine whether the highly controversial process of “bile milking” Asiatic black bears is damaging their hearts. » More …

WSU’s Paul seeks to empower Native Americans with careers in health care

Paul_Robbie_1_2009SPOKANE, Wash. – When Robbie Paul first joined Washington State University almost 20 years ago, it was the beginning of a journey that led her to a PhD, a new-found belief in herself, and a mission to inspire and empower others to pursue higher education.

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