Skip to main content Skip to navigation
Oct. 18: Morality, responsibility and prison reform discussed
October 13, 2016

By Debbie Brudie, Humanities Planning Group

joseph-campbellPULLMAN, Wash. – An interdisciplinary approach to prison reform will be presented by Washington State University professor of politics, philosophy and public affairs Joseph Campbell in a free, public presentation at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 18, in Goertzen Hall 21.

March 28: How scientific research can improve justice
March 21, 2016

Nancy-RodriguezPULLMAN, Wash. – The use of scientific research to improve criminal justice in the U.S. will be discussed by National Institute of Justice Director Nancy Rodriguez at 4 p.m. Monday, March 28, in the CUB auditorium at Washington State University.

Feb. 9: WSU philosopher speaks on the ethics of punishment
February 3, 2016

Matt-StichterPULLMAN, Wash. – Criminal justice reform, punishment and ethics will be considered by Matt Stichter, Washington State University associate professor of philosophy, at a free, public common reading lecture at 5 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 9, in CUE 203.

Nov. 30: Ecologist touts power of nature in prison reform
November 10, 2015

By Adrian Aumen, College of Arts & Sciences

Nadkarni-webPULLMAN, Wash. – An internationally renowned forest ecologist and leader in prison reform will talk about blending science, nature and social justice in a free, public address at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 30, in the CUB auditorium at Washington State University.

Media advisory: Daschle, Lott to discuss political reforms
September 17, 2015

SEATTLE – In a sense, early returns from the 2016 election are already in: Civility is losing to vitriol in a landslide. But two former U.S. Senate majority leaders – Republican Trent Lott of Mississippi and Democrat Tom Daschle of South Dakota – have been promoting a plan to restore civility to governing.

Criminologist takes on regional justice reform
April 30, 2015

By Adrian Aumen, College of Arts & Sciences

van-wormer-webSPOKANE, Wash. – A Washington State University faculty member is steering the first major steps in a comprehensive overhaul of the way Spokane area police, courts, judges and detention centers work together.

Seeking a seamless system
February 16, 2007

A goal of education reformers nationwide is a seamless system that encourages student success by creating easy connections between preschool programs, the K-12 schools and vocational or college options. A recent report comparing the seamlessness of different states (see accompanying story) published in Education Week shows that Washington is rated just above average in that effort. Seamless sounds sensible, but achieving that goal is not easy, noted Judy Mitchell, dean of the College of Education.“The report ignores the differences between each system,” Mitchell said. “Here in higher education, we have no control over the other worlds of K-12, vocational-technical programs or preschools. We have separate … » More …

Comments invited regarding compensation, classification
February 12, 2004

The Department of Personnel (DOP) is inviting feedback on the draft rules covering classification and compensation now through Friday, Feb. 20. The draft rules are available online at http://hr.dop.wa.gov/hrreform, along with an overview of the new system and a comparison of the current rules to the proposed rules.A fourth group of draft class specifications has also been posted for comment.

Job classification draft, contracting rules posted online
January 9, 2004

Some recent updates in the process of implementing the state of Washington’s new civil service reforms were announced in late December. The reform program — which will reduce the number of job classifications, reorganize salary ranges and change private contracting rules — involves feedback from the public. Several of the proposed changes are listed below. If you would like to provide comments, complete the feedback form on the HR 2005 website at http://hr.dop.wa.gov/hrreform.• The most recent draft of the new job classification structure proposes occupational categories and levels. Existing job classes would fit within the new structure, and proposed salary ranges would be assigned … » More …