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WSU scientists help detect gravitational waves for third time
August 7, 2017

black holeBy Will Ferguson, College of Arts and Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Three billion years ago in a distant galaxy, two massive black holes slammed together, merged into one and sent space–time vibrations, known as gravitational waves, shooting out into the universe.

‘Negative mass’ created at Washington State University
April 10, 2017

Michael Forbes WSU physicsBy Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University physicists have created a fluid with negative mass, which is exactly what it sounds like. Push it, and unlike every physical object in the world we know, it doesn’t accelerate in the direction it was pushed. It accelerates backwards.

Ask Dr. Universe: Why do we need stars?
April 4, 2017

Dr. UniversePULLMAN, Wash. – If you are anything like me, you like watching the night sky. The stars we see are a lot like our nearest star, the sun. They are just much farther away. That makes stars look like small twinkly things instead of a big, furious thing like our sun.

New physics, astronomy chair starts Feb. 1
January 30, 2017

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Brian Saam, an expert in experimental atomic physics, will become professor and chair of the Washington State University Department of Physics and Astronomy on Feb. 1.

Ask Dr. Universe: Why does the Earth spin?
October 13, 2016

Dr-Universe-230PULLMAN, Wash. – No matter how still we stand, or if we’re in Scotland, Malaysia or the United States, we are always spinning. Our Earth spins at a constant, very fast speed as we make a trip around the sun.

Rare display of five planets aligned in our skies
January 21, 2016

Planetary-Alignment-web

By Linda Weiford, WSU News

PULLMAN, Wash. – In an unusual celestial show, five planets all at once and visible to the naked eye have begun a nightly parade over the Pacific Northwest.

Scientists publish case study for growing food on Mars
October 20, 2015

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

MartianPULLMAN, Wash. – Scientists at Washington State University and the University of Idaho are helping students figure out how to farm on Mars, much like astronaut Mark Watney, played by Matt Damon, attempts in the critically acclaimed movie “The Martian.”

A blood moon rising, Sept. 27
September 22, 2015

By Linda Weiford, WSU News

moon-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Skygazers in the western United States will get a special autumn treat when the full moon rises Sunday, Sept. 27. For the first time in 33 years, a “supermoon” combined with a lunar eclipse will grace the early evening sky, making the moon glow red and appear slightly bigger.