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WSU News Kelvin Lynn

Discovery for modifying diamonds could change computing – WSU research

By Siddharth Vodnala, intern, Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture

Marc Weber in WSU labPULLMAN, Wash. – A group of WSU researchers has discovered a way to modify diamonds that opens up important applications in the field of quantum computing and in radiation detection. » More …

$1.7 million x-ray microscope to unleash WSU materials research

PULLMAN, Wash. – When it arrives on campus this October, a powerful new $1.7 million x-ray microscope will help Washington State University scientists develop specialized materials for technologies such as self-healing roads, printable batteries and super-efficient solar cells. » More …

Lynn to receive Eminent Faculty Award

PULLMAN, Wash. – Kelvin Lynn will receive the 2017 Washington State University Eminent Faculty Award during the Celebrating Excellence Recognition Banquet on Friday, March 31, part of WSU’s annual Showcase celebration of faculty, staff and student excellence. » More …

Ask Dr. Universe: What is a crystal?

PULLMAN, Wash. – Maybe you’ve caught a snowflake on your tongue. Or sprinkled salt on your food. Perhaps you’ve imagined what it would be like to explore a big crystal cave. » More …

$1.1 million award funds solar technology advances

lynn-crystal-sample-2-webPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have received a $1.1 million U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative cooperative award to improve the performance and lower the cost of solar materials for the multibillion dollar industry. » More …

Key improvement made in solar cell voltage technology

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture

Kelvin-Lynn-80PULLMAN, Wash. – A critical milestone in solar cell fabrication will help pave the way for solar energy to directly compete with electricity generated by conventional energy sources. » More …

Physicists take first steps to harness antimatter

 

Video – “Antimatter – harnessing the power of positrons”

 

 

“This morning, NASA successfully launched the world’s first gamma ray shuttle to the galactic center of the Milky Way. Once there, geo-astronauts say they can mine and harvest enough raw antimatter to power Earth’s energy needs for the next decade. Unfortunately, they won’t be back for centuries…”

Although we won’t see that story on tonight’s six o’ clock news, Kelvin Lynn is serious when  he says it is possible to harness the power of antimatter – and that it may be conceivable to collect that antimatter from a … » More …