Skip to main content Skip to navigation
Animal owners should be aware of wildfire smoke hazards
August 4, 2017

wildfire smoke in skylineBy Charlie Powell, College of Veterinary Medicine

PULLMAN, Wash. – WSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine recommends that animal owners be aware that wildfire smoke advisories, issued by county and municipal health districts for people, apply to animals, too.

WSU looks for practices to thwart antimicrobial resistance
February 28, 2017

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – The death last year of a woman in Reno, Nev., from an infection resistant to every type of antibiotic available in the U.S. highlights how serious the threat of antimicrobial resistance has become.

Vaccinating increases family wealth, girls’ education
December 14, 2016

By Marcia Hill Gossard, College of Veterinary Medicine

PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University-led research team found households in rural Africa that vaccinate their cattle for East Coast fever increased their income and spent the additional money on food and education. Researchers also found that when fewer cattle died from the fever, girls were more likely to attend secondary school.

Licensing deal will help Genus combat deadly cattle disease
July 27, 2016

srikumaran-s-2010-80PULLMAN, Wash. – A gene editing technology developed at Washington State University is being licensed to Genus plc, a global animal genetics company, to develop cattle that are more resistant to bovine respiratory disease (BRD).

July 7: Workshop explains new veterinary feed directive
June 14, 2016

chickensMONROE, Wash. – Livestock owners must acquire a veterinary feed directive (VFD) by Jan. 1 in order to give their food-producing animals health products and feeds that contain drugs deemed medically important to humans. To help producers prepare, a free Livestock Round Pen will be held 7-9 p.m. Thursday, July 7, at the Evergreen State Fairgrounds longhouse, 14405 179th Ave. SE, Monroe.

Bacteria use traffic-cop-like mechanism to infect gut
May 3, 2016

By Linda Weiford, WSU News

KnodlerPULLMAN, Wash. – A study has found that a cellular syringe-like device used to invade intestinal cells also acts as a traffic cop – directing bacteria where to go and thereby enabling them to efficiently carry out infection.