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April 3: Chocolate, parrots and social interaction
March 28, 2017

PULLMAN, Wash. – The importance of cacao and macaws in trade and ritual in the ancient Southwest will be discussed by a visiting anthropologist at 4:10 p.m. Monday, April 3, in Todd Hall 130.

Computer models find ancient solutions to modern problems
December 20, 2016

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University archaeologists are at the helm of new research using sophisticated computer technology to learn how past societies responded to climate change.

Researcher: Turkeys a major part of ancestral Pueblo life
November 22, 2016

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By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Lipe-80PULLMAN, Wash. – While the popular notion of the American Thanksgiving is less than 400 years old, the turkey has been part of American lives for more than 2,000 years. But for much of that time, the bird was more revered than eaten.

Oct. 6: How archaeology aids modern resilience, sustainability
September 19, 2016

By Beverly Makhani, Undergraduate Education

jeremy-sabloff-webPULLMAN, Wash. – Anthropologist Jeremy A. Sabloff will discuss how archaeology can make a difference in today’s world at 5 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6, in Todd Hall 276 at Washington State University.

Class partners with tribe for authentic experience
April 21, 2016

By Maegan Murray, WSU Tri-Cities

MarceauRICHLAND, Wash. – Students got to dig deep in a Washington State University Tri-Cities class recently, exploring archaeology while uncovering authentic materials provided by local Native Americans.

Ask Dr. Universe: Do we drink the same water dinos drank?
April 13, 2016

Dr-Universe-230PULLMAN, Wash. – Yes. The water on our Earth today is the same water that’s been here for nearly 5 billion years. Only a tiny bit of it has escaped out into space. As far as we know, new water hasn’t formed either.

Researchers link climate changes, Pueblo social disruption
April 1, 2016

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

PULLMAN, Wash. – The heavily studied yet largely unexplained disappearance of ancestral Pueblo people from southwest Colorado is “the most vexing and persistent question in Southwestern archaeology,” according to the New York Times.

But it’s not all that unique, say Washington State University scientists.