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WSU News wine grapes

Unseasonable greetings for Washington state’s vineyards

Wine grapes in the major viticulture region of eastern Washington withstood the recent slug of arctic air.

By Linda Weiford, WSU News

PROSSER, Wash. – Washington’s wine industry let out a collective sigh of relief this week as a stiff shot of cold weather gave way to much milder temperatures – just in time for the winter solstice. » More …

Washington’s cooler nights boost flavor of wines

By Nic Loyd, WSU meteorologist, and Linda Weiford, WSU News

weathercatch(2) (2)SPOKANE, Wash. – A little-known secret of many great-tasting wines made in Washington state is literally the difference between night and day. » More …

Grape vines exposed to smoke to test taint from wildfires

Smoke-taint-study-in-Prosser--hoop-house-web
Smoke taint study equipment runs the length of a hoop house of wine grapes at the WSU Prosser research center near WSU Tri-Cities.

By Maegan Murray, WSU Tri-Cities

RICHLAND, Wash. – Wine grapes may appear fine after a harsh wildfire season. But if grapes have smoke taint, the finished wine may taste and smell awful – an unpleasant surprise for growers and wine lovers alike. » More …

Drone captures vineyard irrigation data

By Scott Weybright, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

vine-drone-smallPROSSER, Wash. – People may notice a small, unmanned helicopter flying over Washington vineyards this summer, but don’t worry. Doing work for science, it is fully approved by the Federal Aviation Administration. » More …

Research helps growers conserve water, improve white wines

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

white-wine-grapesPROSSER, Wash. – In arid eastern Washington where most of the state’s wine grapes grow, efficient irrigation is the name of the game. Yet little research has been done to determine the best irrigation strategies for white wine grapes. » More …

Grape seed color not helpful in assessing wine tannins

By Scott Weybright, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

HarbertsonPROSSER, Wash. – For decades, if not centuries, the changing color of a grape’s seed has played a role in determining when winemakers harvest grapes. » More …

WECO donates optical wine grape sorter for research

By Erika Holmes, Viticulture & Enology

wine-sorting-graphic-80WOODLAND, Calif. – WECO Sorting and Automation Solutions has donated a state-of-the-art optical wine grape sorter worth $71,500 to the new Ste. Michelle Wine Estates Wine Science Center at the Washington State University Tri-Cities campus in Richland, Wash. » More …

Students, grapes converge at WSU Wine Science Center

By Erika Holmes, Viticulture & Enology

grapes-processed-80RICHLAND, Wash. – With classes underway, students and researchers have begun processing grapes for experiments on fruit maturity and irrigation at Washington State University’s new wine center. » More …

From wine grape residue to healthful granola bars

McKahan presents research

Gena McKahan presents her research about
granola bars made with grape-seed flour.

PULLMAN, Wash. – The remains of pressed wine grapes typically return to fields as fertilizer, but scientists are finding ways to recycle the edible remains into healthy foods.

For example, Gena McKahan’s merlot grape-seed flour granola bar is gluten free and shows an increase in antioxidant content as the amount of grape-seed flour is increased. Antioxidants found in grapes have been shown to help prevent some cancers and cardiovascular diseases.

A food science undergraduate at Washington State University, McKahan was curious … » More …