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Expertise, effort help horse foal survive complications
September 3, 2004

With advances in medical technology, Caesarean sections and inducing births have become somewhat commonplace procedures for assisting human childbirth. But equine delivery is a horse of a different color.“Horses are a completely different species from all others,” said Dr. Chantal Rothschild, a veterinary medical resident of the equine team at the Washington State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital. “Some parts of the fetal maturation process occur only shortly before and even during birth. When the foal is born without this process completed, severe complications can result, such as respiratory distress, lack of a suckling reflex, gastrointestinal malfunctions and mental retardation. Tough alternatives“A large number of these … » More …

Veterinary college names first endowed chair recipient
August 9, 2004

Subramaniam Srikumaran, a professor at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, has been named the first ever recipient of an endowed chair in the Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine.A cellular and molecular immunologist, Srikumaran is also a veterinarian and is originally from Sri Lanka. Since 1985, he has attracted nearly $2 million in research funding, produced 152 scientific papers and presentations, and successfully mentored 20 graduate students.This week he accepted the Rocky Crate D.V.M. and Foundation for North American Wild Sheep Endowed Chair in Wild Sheep Disease Research based in WSU’s veterinary college. The privately-funded position is dedicated exclusively to research on wild sheep diseases … » More …

WSU research team tackles dairy disease
April 26, 2004

A Washington State University team is battling Johne ’s (pronounced YO-knees) disease, also known as paratuberculosis, a multibillion-dollar problem in the dairy industry worldwide.Paratuberculosis is a chronic, contagious bowel inflammation that causes persistent and progressive diarrhea, weight loss, debilitation and eventually death. It affects cattle, sheep, goats, llamas, camels, farmed deer and other domestic, exotic and wild animals with multiple stomachs. It has also been recognized in wild rabbits.An estimated 22 percent of all U.S. dairy herds are infected with Johne’s disease, although most other countries have much higher infection rates.  This expanded research effort is being funded as part of a $4.4 million grant … » More …

Veterinary College to Host television production
April 26, 2004

PULLMAN, Wash. — The Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine will host the Outdoor Life Network’s new program, “America’s Horse,” April 28 and 29.Host Dr. Kenton Morgan will be at the college taping three segments for “Your Horse’s Health.” The segments will feature some of the unique medical techniques and equipment used by the equine specialists at WSU’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Episodes are expected to air this fall. Filming and narration will bring viewers a close look at the college’s nuclear scintigraphy scanner, magnetic resonance imaging machine, and horse treadmill. “We’re proud to have the chance to show off some of this school’s best … » More …

Animal disease detection aims to protect food supply
September 6, 2002

The Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (WADDL), in the College of Veterinary Medicine, has received a $750,000 federal appropriation to join a founding network of similar facilities dedicated to homeland security.The funding is part of a U.S. Department of Agriculture plan to share responsibilities for animal disease surveillance and diagnosis with accredited state animal health laboratories. The plan enhances the nation’s capability to rapidly detect animal diseases that may affect the nation’s food supply. WADDL is one of only 12 laboratories in the nation selected for the pilot program.USDA not enough”The Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) outbreak in Great Britain, and 9/11 here, taught us … » More …