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Inspired insight
November 10, 2006

Part electrical engineer and part neurophysiologist, Dave Rector often will be found tucked in a far corner of the College of Veterinary Medicine surrounded by a jumble of colored wire, black electrical tape and socket sets. A slight hint of rodent scents the air while a periodic table of the elements hangs above a bubbling lobster tank. Behind his soft-spoken demeanor, Rector’s intensity and vision give his work a futuristic aura — the projects taking place in this unlikely laboratory are quietly breaking down century-old theories in the study of brain function. As associate professor in the Department of Veterinary and Comparative Anatomy, Pharmacology and … » More …

WSU veterinarian elected to Institute of Medicine
October 9, 2006

PULLMAN– Dr. Guy Palmer, a veterinary pathologist at Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, has been elected to membership in the National Academy of Science’s Institute of Medicine (IOM). Election to this prestigious body is one of the highest honors for those in biomedical research and human health care.The institute announced the election of its new members Oct. 9 in Washington, D.C.”This is a tremendous honor and reflects the outstanding scholarly environment at Washington State University,” Palmer said. “I work with a wonderful group of colleagues and students dedicated to better understanding of transmission of vector-borne diseases and innovative approaches to vaccine development. This … » More …

Professor receives Faculty Member of the Year Award
October 6, 2006

PULLMAN– Washington State University associate professor John M. Gay  was awarded the 2006 Washington State Veterinary Medical Association’s Faculty Member of the Year Award.Gay received the award at the WSVMA’s annual convention on Sept. 30 in Yakima.Gay is board certified in veterinary preventive medicine and was recognized for his dedication to the epidemiology of infectious and production diseases of cattle. An outstanding teacher, Gay has a particular interest in those diseases that can be transmitted to humans and those that have food safety implications.”Dr. John Gay is both humble and effective as a teacher and researcher,” said Dr. Rick DeBowes, associate dean for external relations … » More …

Drugs for dogs: aligning medications to breeds
March 15, 2006

PULLMAN – Every dog has his day, and someday, every dog may have his own drug profile. Washington State University veterinary pharmacologist Katrina Mealey has launched a study of how different breeds of dogs react to common medications, and is asking dog owners in the Pacific Northwest for their help. The work was spurred by Mealey’s discovery a few years ago that dogs of herding breeds have a high risk of carrying a mutation that renders normally harmless drugs deadly. “Different breeds react differently to different drugs,” said Mealey. “If you test it in a beagle, it’s fine,” but in a herding dog the same … » More …

Veterinary college releases peregrine falcon near Lewiston
January 27, 2006

LEWISTON — A peregrine falcon, nursed to health by the College of Veterinary Medicine, was released into the wild this week at Tammany Alternative High School near Lewiston. WSU veterinarians chose the site because of a better food supply this time of year and because of its proximity to the bird’s original flyway.Joining in the release were students at Tammany Alternative High School (http://www.lewiston.k12.id.us/school_info.html), who got an up-close look at the world’s fastest animal before it takes to the sky. Peregrines have been measured in a dive to reach speeds of 273 miles an hour.Nicknamed “Narisah” the adult bird was found by a couple driving … » More …

Vet Med lands $1.8M grant from Wellcome Trust
May 17, 2005

PULLMAN — Disease researchers in Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine have been awarded more than $1.8 million from the Wellcome Trust.The funding will be used to continue vaccine development for animal diseases that severely limit health, nutrition and economic growth in poorer countries. The Wellcome Trust is the world’s second largest non-governmental supporter of biomedical research.  Professor Guy Palmer, based in the WSU veterinary college’s Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology, is the $1,805,004 grant’s principal investigator.“We’re of course very grateful to receive this grant support,” said Palmer, who is currently on sabbatical leave in Spain. “To me, this is proof WSU is … » More …

Vet students dominate Veterinary School Olympics
April 1, 2005

Washington State University veterinary students recently brought home the 2005 gold medal for overall team competition in the national Veterinary School Olympics.”I’ve been a judge at this competition before,” said Gil Burns, associate dean for academics and student affairs in the college. “Each year this serves as an objective indication of the high quality and competence of WSU veterinary students. Frankly, we’re not surprised when our students do so well.”It’s also great fun and a welcome release mentally and physically for students in this very tough, professional curriculum.”The annual event, sponsored by the Student Chapters of the American Veterinary Medical Association, invites all of North … » More …

Brian Pitcher to serve as acting dean of pharmacy
March 2, 2005

WSU Spokane Chancellor Brian Pitcher takes on the additional role of acting dean of the College of Pharmacy May 16, as announced by WSU Provost Robert Bates in a meeting of the college March 1.The university expects to have a new permanent dean hired for the college by the time classes start in the fall. Current pharmacy dean William E. Fassett announced last fall he intends to return to faculty status next fall. His last day as dean will be May 15.A search is underway for a new dean of the college, with applications due April 1. The search committee will begin screening applications late … » More …

Infant hearts contain body’s largest protein
February 18, 2005

Titin is a giant, spring-like protein that helps give all muscles their elastic recoil. It also gives the heart its ability to retain its shape after each beat. Veterinary research conducted at Washington State University has revealed that an unusually large form of titin in nearly born and newborn children makes their growing hearts more elastic than those of adults. Sunshine Lahmers, a veterinary cardiology resident, and her WSU research colleagues made the discovery, which was published in the March 2004 issue of Circulation Research. Lahmers’ work is a collaboration between veterinarians and physicians to understand species differences and similarities in heart development and disease. … » More …

Vet Med selects new community practice chief
December 30, 2004

Matthew Mickas has accepted a leadership position in the Washington State University Community Practice section of the Veterinary Teaching Hospital. A 1997 summa cum laude graduate of WSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine, he will come to WSU from San Jose.”We couldn’t be more excited,” said Dr. Rick DeBowes, chair of WSU’s Veterinary Clinical Sciences Department. “Matt brings a wealth of professional experience from multiple practice settings and a keen awareness of the importance of effectively preparing students to bring immediate impact and value to the practices they join. He will be a great addition to our program as we elevate our efforts to model compliance-based … » More …