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WSU News human nutrition

A mother’s microbial gift

PULLMAN, Wash. – It happened again, most recently at a conference in Prague. After she gave her talk, a scientist came up to Shelley McGuire, a pioneer exploring the microbial communities found in human breast milk, and told her, “You don’t know how to take a sample. Your samples must have been contaminated. Human milk is sterile.” » More …

WSU CAHNRS employees honored

Faculty and staff of Washington State University’s College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences were honored for their achievements at the 47th annual college awards banquet April 8.Boon P. Chew, professor and scientist in the food science and human nutrition department, received the R. M. Wade Excellence in Teaching and Learning Award.  Chew, a member of the faculty for 27 years, was recognized for his ability to make difficult material understandable in a learning environment described as fun.  He is consistently rated as very enthusiastic, knowledgeable, helpful, fair and caring in course evaluations.Larry K. Hiller, associate professor of horticulture, received the college’s Excellence in … » More …

Dodging kidney stones and bullets in Iraq

An ailment that afflicts U.S. soldiers fighting in Iraq has prompted the U.S. government to call upon a Washington State University researcher for her assistance.Linda Massey, professor of human nutrition at WSU Spokane, is a world expert on diet’s influence on kidney stones. Kidney stones are uncommon in people under the age of 30; however, soldiers in Iraq, most of whom are in their 20s, have an increased risk of developing kidney stones due to their unique lifestyle.Since 1991, Massey has studied the effects of variables such as milk, meat, soy protein, caffeine, salt and vitamin C on the formation of kidney stones. She was … » More …