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WSU News indigenous

Grant funds expansion of indigenous digital archiving

By Nella Letizia, WSU Libraries

PULLMAN, Wash. – Representatives from indigenous archives across the country are at Washington State University through Thursday for planning and training on a free, open-source platform to help tribal communities share their digital cultural heritage. » More …

April 10 proposal deadline for indigenous conference

PULLMAN, Wash. – Research abstracts will be accepted from faculty, staff and students through April 10 for paper and poster presentations at the Indigenous Research Convention for the educational, health and social sciences to be held April 23 in the Native American Center in Cleveland Hall at Washington State University Pullman. » More …

Mestizo center publishes first online journal

By Breck Smith, College of Education intern

Brian-McNeilPULLMAN, Wash. – The first online journal addressing topics for the Pacific Northwest’s Mestizo and indigenous communities has been published by the Washington State University College of Education’s Center for Mestizo and Indigenous Research and Engagement. » More …

Non-technical, indigenous journal solicits manuscripts

mestizo-journal-600

By C. Brandon Chapman, College of Education

PULLMAN, Wash. – A native education group at Washington State University is issuing a call for manuscripts for the new Journal of Mestizo and Indigenous Voices, the first online journal for the College of Education’s Center for Mestizo and Indigenous Research and Engagement. » More …

Researchers to study the role of bacteria in sediments

Brent Peyton and Rajesh Sani, researchers in the Washington State University Center for Multiphase Environmental Research, received a four-year $1.2 million grant for a project to characterize indigenous microorganisms in the metal-contaminated sediments of Idaho’s Lake Coeur d’Alene and to analyze their role in the transport of metals through the environment.The work, sponsored by the National Science Foundation’s Biocomplexity Program, could someday be used to better predict metal transport processes in contaminated sediments and improve bioremediation strategies.A long history of mining in the Pacific Northwest has led to high levels of heavy metals in the sediments of some area lakes and rivers. However, microorganisms that … » More …