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New water-splitting method could open path to hydrogen economy
February 1, 2018

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture

catalyst nanofoam close upPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have found a way to more efficiently generate hydrogen from water — an important key to making clean energy more viable.

Better water splitting advances renewable energy conversion
October 25, 2016

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture

catlyst-webPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have found a way to more efficiently create hydrogen from water – an important key in making renewable energy production and storage viable.

Researchers reduce costly noble metals for fuel cell reactions
August 22, 2016

By Erik Gomez, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture intern

yuehe-LinPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have developed a novel nanomaterial that could improve the performance and lower the costs of fuel cells by using fewer precious metals like platinum or palladium.

Researchers improve biosensors to detect E. coli
June 13, 2016

By Erik Gomez, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture intern

yuehe-LinPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have developed a portable biosensor that makes it easier to detect harmful bacteria.

Natural protein cage would improve cancer drug delivery
October 26, 2015

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture

yuehe-LinPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have developed a unique, tiny protein cage to deliver nasty chemotherapy chemicals directly to cancer cells. Direct delivery could improve treatment and lessen what can be horrendous side effects from toxic drugs.

Professor among world’s most highly cited researchers
September 18, 2015

yuehe-LinPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University’s Yuehe Lin is among the top-cited scientific researchers in the world, named by Thomson Reuters among the top 1 percent of those cited in their fields for articles published 2003-13.