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Salary increases arrive for classified staff

Civil service employees may notice their paychecks have increased thanks to a previously announced raise going into effect.

All eligible civil service employees received a 3.25% increase as of July 1, with the July 25 paycheck being the first to reflect it.

The Washington State Legislature provided the funding to grant non‑union represented classified staff the 3.25% raise this year. Represented classified staff should check their relevant collective bargaining agreements for information on wage increases and timing.

Human Resource Services has put together FAQs for employees regarding this year’s salary increases.

Faculty, administrative professional and graduate assistants will be eligible for a 2.5% salary increase effective Sept. 1. The increase will first be reflected on the second paycheck of the month, which this year is Sept. 26. The salary increase for this group — the largest in seven years — is made possible with a combination of state and university funding.

WSU President Kirk Schulz has previously said employee compensation will remain the university’s top priority in the forthcoming legislative session.

Certain job classifications identified by the Office of Financial Management – State Human Resource, were also eligible for a step up in their salary range as of July 1. A complete list of these job classification changes is available on HRS’ website.

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