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Faculty from 15 universities attend WSU institute

Kayleen Pritchard from the Pacific Education Institute and Rodger Hauge from Eastern Washington University (l-r in photo above) were two of the 26 faculty from 15 Washington colleges and universities who came to WSU for the Teachers of Teachers of Science (TOTOS) conference, June 8 through 10.

The TOTOS members spent part of their time at Klemgard County Park, east of Pullman, in a hands-on experience with environmental education.

In the attached photo, Pritchard and Hauge are checking for macroinvertibrates in Union Flat Creek at Klemgard Park.

TOTOS was established in 1997 by John Paznokas, associate professor of the School of Biological Sciences, as a professional organization for university faculty involved in preparing the university students who will teach K-12 science.  He explained that the goal of the organization is the improvement of communication among those faculty and the improvement of the science preparation offered to future teachers.

Since 1997, TOTOS members have met every summer at the Pullman campus.  This summer for the first time, Paznokas said, the group received grant support for their meeting and the curriculum developed.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service provided support for this conference focus on environmental education.

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