WSU News

Category: Press Releases

Cupola repairs planned for historic Ensminger Pavilion

By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University’s Ensminger Pavilion, a livestock-judging barn turned events center, will get an upgrade to its historic cupola this summer.Continue reading

Study: Environmental epigenetics affects disease, evolution

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Skinner-Michael-2012-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers say environmental factors are having an underappreciated effect on the course of disease and evolution by prompting genetic mutations through epigenetics, a process by which genes are turned on and off independent of an organism’s DNA sequence.Continue reading

Committed donor, volunteer receives alumni award

Jim-Ruck-80EVERETT, Wash. – Jim Ruck, retired engineer and production manager and active community volunteer, was honored Sunday, July 26, with the Washington State University Alumni Association (WSUAA) Alumni Achievement Award in recognition of six decades of dedication and service to WSU.Continue reading

Researchers get $1.8M to improve hip, knee replacements

Bandyopadhyay-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have received support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to improve materials used in hip and knee replacements.Continue reading

Aug. 3: WSU hosts workshop on organic practices

By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

WSU-Eggert-farm-tractor-webPULLMAN, Wash. – Learn about organic farming, composting and soil fertility at a Tilth Producers of Washington workshop 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 3, at Washington State University’s Eggert Family Organic Farm in Pullman.Continue reading

Single hair shows researchers what a bear has been eating

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Grizzly-80PULLMAN, Wash. – U.S. and Canadian researchers have found they can get a good idea of a grizzly bear’s diet over several months by looking at a single hair. The technique, which measures residues of trace metals, can be a major tool in determining if the threatened animals are getting enough of the right foods to eat.Continue reading