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WSU News Sleep

WSU study to test sleep technology in chronic insomnia

By Judith Van Dongen, WSU Spokane Office of Research

Devon Grant, WSU sleep researcher

SPOKANE, Wash. – If you spend your nights staring at the bedroom ceiling, you’re not alone. About a quarter of U.S. adults suffer from insomnia, which significantly impacts their quality of life. » More …

WSU researchers see gene influencing performance of sleep-deprived people

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts and Sciences

paul-whitney wsu psychology

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have discovered a genetic variation that predicts how well people perform certain mental tasks when they are sleep-deprived. » More …

‘Sleep gene’ offers clues about why we need our zzzs

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Jason GerstnerSPOKANE, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have seen how a particular gene is involved in the quality of sleep experienced by three different animals, including humans. The gene and its function open a new avenue for scientists exploring how sleep works and why animals need it so badly. » More …

New study to investigate role of sleep in chronic pain

By Judith Van Dongen, WSU Spokane

marian-wilson-webSPOKANE, Wash. – Washington State University will lead a study to understand the relationship between sleep and chronic pain, part of a nationwide effort to address the rising abuse of opioid pain relievers and expand the arsenal of non-drug treatment options. » More …

$1.7M to counteract poor decision-making due to sleep loss

Sleep lab at WSU Spokane. (Photo by Robert Hubner, WSU Photo Services)

By Judith Van Dongen, WSU Spokane

SPOKANE, Wash. – Researchers from Washington State University’s Sleep and Performance Research Center received a $1.7 million grant to develop and test cognitive flexibility training to combat the effects of sleep loss on decision-making under rapidly changing circumstances. » More …

Feb. 29: Effects of police bias, fatigue, distraction discussed

just-mercyPULLMAN, Wash. – The implications of racial bias, fatigue and distracted driving on the police and communities they serve will be discussed at 5 p.m. Monday, Feb. 29, in CUE 203 at Washington State University as part of the free, public common reading lecture series. » More …