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WSU News Molecular Biology

WSU receives NIH grant to study heart problems at molecular level

Tolkatchev
Tolkatchev

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have received a $1.57 million National Institutes of Health grant to understand the molecular-scale mechanisms that cause cardiomyopathy, or heart muscle disease. » More …

WSU researchers deliver first “nanotherapeutics” to tumor

By Eric Sorensen, WSU News

SPOKANE, Wash. – For the first time, WSU researchers have demonstrated a way to deliver a drug to a tumor by attaching it to a blood cell. The innovation could let doctors target tumors with anticancer drugs that might otherwise damage healthy tissues. » More …

WSU researchers find plague bacterium endures in soil

By Laura Lockard, WSU College of Veterinary Medicine

PULLMAN, Wash. – The bacterium that causes bubonic plague has been found to survive in the common amoeba, the microorganism most children often see first in a grade school microscope. » More …

Toxic effects of mercury persists for generations

PULLMAN, Wash. – Zebrafish exposed to very low levels of methylmercury as embryos not only passed on toxic effects of the chemical exposure to their offspring, but also to the third generation, according to a study that investigated both epigenetic changes – chemical modifications to the DNA – and abnormal neuro-behavior associated with exposure. » More …

Technology helps preserve fertility of boys with cancer

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Jon OatleyPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have found a promising way to preserve sperm stem cells so boys could undergo cancer treatment without risking their fertility. » More …

Plant inner workings point way to more nutritious crops

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

PULLMAN, Wash. – Almost every calorie that we eat at one time went through the veins of a plant. If a plant’s circulatory system could be rejiggered to make more nutrients available – through bigger seeds or sweeter tomatoes – the world’s farmers could feed more people. » More …

Magnuson to be honored with lifetime service award

PULLMAN, Wash. – Nancy Magnuson, emeritus professor in the School of Molecular Biosciences, will receive the Lane V. Rawlins President’s Award for Distinguished Lifetime Service during the annual Celebrating Excellence Recognition Banquet on Friday, March 31, part of Washington State University’s annual Showcase celebration of faculty, staff and student excellence. » More …

Ask Dr. Universe: How does digestion work?

dr-universe-logoPULLMAN, Wash. – All around the world, animals are eating all kinds of different foods. Our foods might be different, but one thing is true for all of us: We have to digest. » More …