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WSU News Molecular Biology

Toxic effects of mercury persists for generations

PULLMAN, Wash. – Zebrafish exposed to very low levels of methylmercury as embryos not only passed on toxic effects of the chemical exposure to their offspring, but also to the third generation, according to a study that investigated both epigenetic changes – chemical modifications to the DNA – and abnormal neuro-behavior associated with exposure. » More …

Technology helps preserve fertility of boys with cancer

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Jon OatleyPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have found a promising way to preserve sperm stem cells so boys could undergo cancer treatment without risking their fertility. » More …

Plant inner workings point way to more nutritious crops

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

PULLMAN, Wash. – Almost every calorie that we eat at one time went through the veins of a plant. If a plant’s circulatory system could be rejiggered to make more nutrients available – through bigger seeds or sweeter tomatoes – the world’s farmers could feed more people. » More …

Magnuson to be honored with lifetime service award

PULLMAN, Wash. – Nancy Magnuson, emeritus professor in the School of Molecular Biosciences, will receive the Lane V. Rawlins President’s Award for Distinguished Lifetime Service during the annual Celebrating Excellence Recognition Banquet on Friday, March 31, part of Washington State University’s annual Showcase celebration of faculty, staff and student excellence. » More …

Ask Dr. Universe: How does digestion work?

dr-universe-logoPULLMAN, Wash. – All around the world, animals are eating all kinds of different foods. Our foods might be different, but one thing is true for all of us: We have to digest. » More …

Fat in feces points to early presence of colorectal cancer

By Rebecca Phillips, University Communications

Hill-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Scientists at Washington State University and Johns Hopkins Medical School have discovered a fast, noninvasive method that could lead to the early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. » More …

Student research, retention thrive with team mentoring

By Steve Nakata, Student Affairs

PULLMAN, Wash. – While their friends spent the summer waiting tables or stocking store shelves, three Washington State University seniors donned white lab coats and helped advance research in reproductive biology. » More …