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WSU News cancer treatment

Visionary biochemist to receive top WSU alumni award

PULLMAN, Wash. – Biochemist James A. Wells, a pioneering engineer of proteins, antibodies and small molecules that target cell sites to thwart disease and enhance drug therapies, will receive the Regents’ Distinguished Alumnus Award at 3:45 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 25, in the CUB auditorium at Washington State University. » More …

Natural protein cage would improve cancer drug delivery

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture

yuehe-LinPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have developed a unique, tiny protein cage to deliver nasty chemotherapy chemicals directly to cancer cells. Direct delivery could improve treatment and lessen what can be horrendous side effects from toxic drugs. » More …

Researchers find path to help cancer cells die

Video by Matt Haugen, WSU News Service

SPOKANE — WSU researchers have discovered a way to help cancer cells age and die, creating a promising avenue for slowing and even stopping the growth of tumors.

 

“Hopefully, we can make cancer cells die like normal cells,” said Weihang Chai, an assistant professor in the WSU School of Molecular Biosciences and WWAMI medical education program in Spokane. “Basically, you make the cancer cell go from immortal to mortal.”

Normal cells lose a little bit of their DNA every time they reproduce as the molecule’s strands lose part of their protective tips, called telomeres. Eventually, … » More …