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WSU News suicide

Personal tragedy fuels student’s passion for helping others with depression

By Steve Nakata, Student Affairs

Morgan Slack and Tyler PULLMAN, Wash. – Morgan Slack knew the warning signs for people contemplating suicide. As a Washington State University student, she even trained other students how to spot them as part of her work at the university’s Health and Wellness Services. » More …

Washington a model for suicide prevention training

By Addy Hatch, College of Nursing

SPOKANE, Wash. – More than half the states mandate suicide-prevention training for public school teachers, but only seven states have policies requiring healthcare professionals to get similar training. That’s one of the findings of a research study conducted by Washington State University College of Nursing student Sara Van Natta. » More …

Through February: WSU display explores mental health

By Nella Letizia, WSU Libraries

James-WhitbreadPULLMAN, Wash. – In the United States, 43.8 million adults experience mental illness each year, yet it remains a topic of secrecy and stigma for many, including on college campuses. » More …

Empty boots line hallway for veteran suicide awareness

By Maegan Murray, WSU Tri-Cities

RICHLAND, Wash. – Twenty-two military boots lined the entrance to the West Building Tuesday at Washington State University Tri-Cities to demonstrate the stark reality of veteran suicide in the United States. » More …

Gender and shift work influence police depression

Depression and suicidal thoughts among police officers differ based on gender and work shift, according to a recent study co-authored by Bryan Vila, professor of criminal justice and member of the Sleep and Performance Research Center at WSU Spokane. Results appear in the October 2008 edition of the American Journal of Industrial Medicine.

 

A quarter of female police officers and nearly as many male officers assigned to shift work had thought about taking their own lives, said the study in a report by the State University of New York at Buffalo. In addition, reports of depressive symptoms … » More …

33rd heart memorializing murderer questioned

Signs were attached to WSU’s giant blue heart statue this morning, carrying messages disagreeing with there being a 33rd paper heart memorializing the suicidal gunman who killed 32 innocent people at Virginia Tech on April 16. The April 16 killing rampage was the most deadly incident on any U.S. college campus in history. The gunman, Seung-hui Cho, 23, was a senior English student at Virginia Tech.Signs read: Dear Campus Involvement. Suicide does not equal murder. Please stop counting it, 32. The 33 paper hearts were placed in the ground by Campus Involvement to remember all the deaths at Virginia Tech. Greg Wilkins, director for Campus Involvement, said his group was hopeful that the hearts would stay up … » More …

Recognizing signs of suicide

Last year, more than 800 WSU students sought help at Counseling and Testing Services for depression and/or thoughts of suicide. That number includes only students on the Pullman campus and does not include group counseling or after-hours crisis calls. “We take these issues very seriously,” said Cassandra Nichols, counseling services associate director. “We have seven full-time psychologists on our faculty, plus about 30 predoctoral practicum students and four interns. Everyone is carefully trained to treat student depression and suicide.”Their mission is to serve the mental health needs of the students, but recent litigation has served as a reminder that treating students also includes concern for issues … » More …