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WSU News prostate cancer

Non-invasive prostate cancer diagnosing, monitoring

Ph.D. student Parissa Ziaei prepares silica nanosprings for a prostate cancer detection device in Su Ha’s lab at the Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering at WSU.

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Technology being developed at Washington State University provides a non-invasive approach for diagnosing prostate cancer and tracking the disease’s progression. » More …

Mechanism triggers spread of prostate cancer to bones

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

SPOKANE, Wash. – A Washington State University researcher has found a way that prostate cancer cells hijack the body’s bone maintenance, facilitating the spread of bone cancers present in some 90 percent of prostate-cancer fatalities. » More …

Genetic tests to be offered for prostate, breast cancers

By Lorraine Nelson, WSU Spokane

Trobridge-80SPOKANE, Wash. – A genetic testing company will make available tests for prostate cancer survival and breast cancer recurrence to patients following identification of the biomarker genes in a Washington State University laboratory. » More …

$2M grant to fund initial clinical trials in prostate cancer

Berkman-CSEATTLE – An imaging agent discovered by a Washington State University researcher that homes in on prostate cancer will be developed for human clinical trials thanks to a two-year $2 million federal Small Business Innovation Research grant. » More …

Researchers show how fatty acids can fight prostate cancer

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

MeierSPOKANE, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have found a mechanism by which omega-3 fatty acids inhibit the growth and spread of prostate cancer cells. The findings, which are at odds with a 2013 study asserting that omega-3s increase the risk of prostate cancer, point the way to more effective anti-cancer drugs. » More …

Researcher studies prostate cancer gene mutations

TrobridgePULLMAN, Wash. – The genes involved in the progression of prostate cancer from non-threatening to highly malignant are the focus of a new research project at Washington State University.

Grant D. Trobridge has received an award of $417,818 from the National Cancer Institute to identify which gene mutations cause the cancer to become threatening.

Prostate cancer is generally accepted as slow growing. It sometimes remains confined to the prostate gland and needs little or no treatment, while other times it spreads quickly.

“We know that several key genes have to be mutated before you get cancer,” Trobridge said. “Different tumors … » More …