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WSU News Environmental Studies

Stream, watershed stewardship class starts Feb. 2

POULSBO, Wash. – Stream and watershed stewardship classes will be held 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Thursdays, Feb. 2-March 9, at Island Lake John Horsley Community Room, 1087 Northwest Island Lake Road, in Poulsbo. » More …

Researchers develop environmentally friendly, soy air filter

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have developed a soy-based air filter that can capture toxic chemicals, such as carbon monoxide and formaldehyde, that current air filters can’t. » More …

Computer models find ancient solutions to modern problems

WSU scientists use data from archaeological sites like the 1,200-year-old Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon, N.M., to study how ancient peoples adapted to climate change in the American Southwest. (Photo by Nate Crabtree)

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University archaeologists are at the helm of new research using sophisticated computer technology to learn how past societies responded to climate change. » More …

Chancellor named fellow of National Academy of Inventors

By Maegan Murray, WSU Tri-Cities

RICHLAND, Wash. – H. Keith Moo-Young, chancellor of Washington State University Tri-Cities, has been named a 2016 fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. » More …

Research: Arctic’s role as climate moderator threatened

Arctic ice research. (Photo by Paul Dodd)

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

Von Walden

SAN FRANCISCO – Scientists in a rare and sometimes dangerous study of the Arctic have found that the region’s thinning sea ice is more prone to melting and storms, threatening its role as a moderator of the planet’s climate. » More …

Study finds life under lake ice complex, surprisingly active

By Eric Sorensen, WSU science writer

stephanie-hampton-80PULLMAN, Wash. – As long as ecologists have studied temperate lakes, the winter has been their off-season. It’s difficult, even dangerous, to look under the ice, and they figured plants, animals and algae weren’t doing much in the dark and cold anyway. » More …

Grant brings science of stormwater pollution to businesses

By Scott Weybright, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

stormwater-logo-80pPUYALLUP, Wash. – Businesses in the Puget Sound watershed must navigate a complex series of stormwater runoff regulations and permits. But business owners often don’t understand why those regulations exist. » More …

Better water splitting advances renewable energy conversion

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture

catlyst-webPULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have found a way to more efficiently create hydrogen from water – an important key in making renewable energy production and storage viable. » More …

Nov 18: Free summit looks at future of food in Seattle

few-graphicWOODINVILLE, Wash. – The need to integrate management of natural resources like water, energy and food in the greater Seattle area will be discussed during the free, interactive Urban Food-Energy-Water Summit on Friday, Nov. 18, in the Brightwater Convention Center. » More …