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WSU News Environmental Studies

Researchers find new clues for nuclear waste cleanup

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture

PULLMAN, Wash. – A Washington State University study of the chemistry of technetium-99 has improved understanding of the challenging nuclear waste and could lead to better cleanup methods. » More …

African roots inspire professor’s varied water research

By Maegan Murray, WSU Tri-Cities

RICHLAND, Wash. – After growing up in drought-afflicted Ethiopia, Yonas Demissie values water. His research to manage the life-sustaining resource reaches from the U.S. military to the Nile River basin, from Washington’s Hanford nuclear site to biofuels crops and the Gulf of Mexico. » More …

WSU research highlights deforestation threat to jaguars

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Accelerating deforestation of jaguar habitat, especially in corridors connecting conservation areas, threatens the long-term survival of the iconic predator, according to new research by Dan Thornton, an assistant professor in the Washington State University School of the Environment. » More …

March 10: Abstract deadline for environmental papers

PULLMAN, Wash. – Abstract submissions are due March 10 from graduate students in the humanities, social sciences and biophysical sciences at Washington State University and University of Idaho for an interdisciplinary conference April 1 at WSU. » More …

Ask Dr. Universe: Why do nonbiodegradables decay slowly?

PULLMAN, Wash. – It can take a really long time for some things to decay. If we buried an apple peel in the backyard, it might only take a few weeks to break down into the soil. But if we buried a plastic water bottle, it would probably still be there hundreds of years from now. » More …

Feb. 7: Ecological history of Coke capitalism discussed

PULLMAN, Wash. – Environmental historian Bart Elmore will discuss his international journey to document the ecological footprint of the Coca-Cola Co., and his subsequent book, “Citizen Coke: The Making of Coca-Cola Capitalism,” at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 7, in the CUB ballroom. » More …

Feb. 15 deadline for food-energy-water collaboration

PULLMAN, Wash. – Interdisciplinary research teams poised to address food-energy-water (FEW) system challenges are encouraged to submit a proposal by Feb. 15 to participate in a tri-state workshop April 10-11. » More …

Stream, watershed stewardship class starts Feb. 2

POULSBO, Wash. – Stream and watershed stewardship classes will be held 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Thursdays, Feb. 2-March 9, at Island Lake John Horsley Community Room, 1087 Northwest Island Lake Road, in Poulsbo. » More …

Researchers develop environmentally friendly, soy air filter

By Tina Hilding, Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have developed a soy-based air filter that can capture toxic chemicals, such as carbon monoxide and formaldehyde, that current air filters can’t. » More …

Computer models find ancient solutions to modern problems

WSU scientists use data from archaeological sites like the 1,200-year-old Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon, N.M., to study how ancient peoples adapted to climate change in the American Southwest. (Photo by Nate Crabtree)

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University archaeologists are at the helm of new research using sophisticated computer technology to learn how past societies responded to climate change. » More …