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WSU News West Nile virus

First 2017 West Nile Virus cases confirmed from Spokane County; WSU offers resources for horse owners

west nile virus injection kitBy Charlie Powell, College of Veterinary  Medicine

PULLMAN, Wash. – Following the announcement of the state’s first two West Nile Virus cases for 2017, Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is offering important resources for horse owners. » More …

Bird populations suffer; regional increase expected

(Copyrighted photo from istock.com )Drastic population declines among several common species of North American birds have been recorded since the arrival of the West Nile virus in 1999. Some of those trends are beginning to be seen in the region and may become more apparent in Washington state in the future, according to a WSU scientist.In a nationwide study, including 20 species, American crows were the hardest hit, declining about 45 percent overall from 1998 to 2005. Also dropping are populations of American robins, chickadees, eastern bluebirds, blue jays, tufted titmice and house wrens.Data for the study came from a North American Breeding Bird survey, which … » More …

West Nile Virus lecture on Dec. 5

Washington State University Vancouver’s biology club is sponsoring a Dec. 5 lecture on the West Nile Virus, a newly emerging disease threatening both human and animal populations. WSU graduate Dr. Pamela Jen of Healing Star Veterinary Clinic will share current research on the cause, spread, symptoms and prevention of the West Nile Virus during a free, one-hour lecture from noon-1 p.m. in the Student Services Building, Room 129.WNV is a mosquito-borne disease that killed 199 people this year in the United States and Canada. Wildlife and domestic animals, particularly horses and birds, are especially vulnerable to infection and serve as host carriers of the disease. … » More …

West Nile virus arrives as WSU research progresses

Last month the Washington Department of Health announced the state’s first apparent human case of West Nile virus (WNV). The flavivirus, which can cause encephalitis in birds, horses and humans, was first identified by a veterinary pathologist at the Bronx zoo in 1999. Since then the disease has spread across the continental United States much faster than expected by public health officials. Though extensive work is being done nationwide to identify the exact nature of this disease, much about the West Nile virus is unknown. What is known is how the disease is spread. It involves a bird-mosquito-bird cycle where birds, bitten by infected mosquitoes, … » More …

Tips on avoiding West Nile Virus offered

VANCOUVER, Wash. — Washington State University Vancouver’s Department of Nursing will present a June 21 lecture to explain how people can help control the spread of West Nile Virus.The free, one-hour lecture will begin at 10 a.m. in the Student Services Lecture Hall at WSU Vancouver. WSU alumna Dr. Pamela Jen of Healing Star Veterinary Clinic will discuss the history, transmission and symptoms of the WNV.WNV, a newly emerging disease that threatens human and animal populations, is a mosquito-borne disease that has killed 284 people in the United States and Canada. Wildlife and domestic animals, particularly horses and birds, are especially vulnerable to infection and … » More …