Skip to main content Skip to navigation
Photographing the elusive, endangered lynx
April 27, 2017

lynx in wild - wsu researchBy Will Ferguson, College of Arts and Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – Deep in the forests of Washington’s Kettle Mountains, Washington State University wildlife biologist Daniel Thornton searches for signs of a rare and elusive type of wild cat — the lynx.

Oct. 12, 13: Changes, challenge of energy market explored
September 27, 2016

By Monique Van Sant, WSU Tri-Cities intern

conca-webRICHLAND, Wash. – Scientist James Conca will talk about the evolution and future of the worldwide energy market and specific dangers facing energy sources at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 12, and at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 13, in the East Auditorium at Washington State University Tri-Cities.

Student helps inmates restore greater sage-grouse habitat
October 28, 2015

By Maegan Murray, WSU Tri-Cities

CONNELL, Wash. – Education has cultivated Gretchen Graber’s growth as an environmental scientist, so teaching inmates to raise sagebrush to restore habitat for the greater sage-grouse seemed like a natural offshoot.

Summer research: Future doctor learns science education
August 6, 2015

By Maegan Murray, WSU Tri-Cities

Adriana-GuzmanRICHLAND, Wash. – Education is helping Adriana Guzman pursue her dream of becoming a doctor, so she chose a summer research project about educating the next generation of environmental scientists. The focus isn’t health science, but she still found common ground.

Environmental scientist receives Alumni Achievement Award
May 22, 2015

Martin-alumni-award-80RICHLAND, Wash. – Wayne J. Martin, recently retired from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as acting chief operations officer for national security directorate, was honored Friday with the Washington State University Alumni Association (WSUAA) Alumni Achievement Award in recognition of career achievements, mentorship of aspiring scientists and service to education in the Tri-Cities community.

Education as transformation
April 14, 2006

While many students enter college wondering “What’s in it for me?” WSU’s “Self in Society” learning goal challenges faculty members to send students out into the world with a different question to ponder: “How can I contribute?” The tough question is, “What does that look like when it comes to curriculum?” In Rick Gill’s Environmental Science 101 class, students chart their water usage for three weeks. Students in Lisa Carloye’s ntomology 401 class write critically informed position papers exploring the multifaceted context of current socially scientific debates, such as stem-cell research. And in March Denny Davis and four of his students in bioengineering spent two … » More …