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June 19-30: Native American students at health sciences camp

By Kevin Dudley, WSU Spokane

SPOKANE, Wash. – Twenty students from Northwest tribal groups will learn about Washington State University health sciences programs and get tips on planning for and applying to college at a June 19-30 summer camp at WSU Spokane.

The 21st annual Na-ha-shnee Native American Health Sciences Institute will highlight careers in physical therapy, medicine, occupational therapy, dental hygiene, public health and more. Students will learn in the genetics forensics lab, pharmacy compounding lab, anatomy lab and nursing simulation lab. They will also get CPR/First Aid certification.

“The students joining us this summer have expressed a strong interest in health careers and a desire to pursue college degrees and return to serve their communities,” said Emma Noyes, outreach coordinator for WSU Spokane’s Native American Health Sciences program (https://spokane.wsu.edu/about/community-outreach/native-american-health-sciences/).

The Kalispel tribe of Indians will sponsor a field trip for the students to Camas Path clinic and recreational facility in Cusick, Wash. Other camp sponsors are the Puyallup Nation, Wells Fargo, Spokane Teachers Credit Union, the Trude Smith Endowment at the WSU College of Nursing and the Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine.

 

Contacts:
Emma Noyes, WSU Native American Health Sciences, 509-324-7215, cell 505-264-1965, emma.noyes@wsu.edu

 

 

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