WSU Cougar Head Logo Washington State University
WSU Insider
News and Information for Faculty, Staff, and the WSU Community

March 24: WSU Tri-Cities hosts speaker on Chicana history

ChicanaHistory-mugRICHLAND, Wash. – Antonia Castaneda, an award-winning retired professor of history, will give a free, public presentation on Chicana history and the first generation of historians who founded that academic discipline 3-5 p.m. Thursday, March 24, in the East Auditorium at Washington State University Tri-Cities.

Author of the award-winning article, “Women of Color and the Rewriting of Western History: The Discourse, Politics and Decolonization of History,” Castaneda is the recipient of the 2007 Scholar of the Year award from the National Association for Chicano and Chicana Studies. The Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund honored her with its Community Achievement Award in 2015.

She held appointments in the department of Chicana/o studies and women’s studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and in the history departments at the University of Texas at Austin and at St. Mary’s University in San Antonio.

 

Contact:
Maegan Murray, WSU Tri-Cities public relations specialist, 509-372-7333, maegan.murray@tricity.wsu.edu

 

 

Next Story

Kimmerer lecture Tuesday prompts luncheon, watch parties, museum booklet

WSU programs are hosting watch parties and other activities for students to engage in the common-reading virtual lecture by “Braiding Sweetgrass” author Robin Wall Kimmerer at 6 p.m. Tuesday evening.

Recent News

Kimmerer lecture Tuesday prompts luncheon, watch parties, museum booklet

WSU programs are hosting watch parties and other activities for students to engage in the common-reading virtual lecture by “Braiding Sweetgrass” author Robin Wall Kimmerer at 6 p.m. Tuesday evening.

Mourning the loss of Tyre Nichols

Washington State University System President Kirk Schulz released the following letter to the WSU community on Friday, Jan. 27 addressing the tragic death of Tyre Nichols earlier this month.

Forest debris could shelter huckleberry from climate change

WSU scientists are at work in Northwest forests, studying how fallen logs and other woodland debris could shelter the huckleberry from a hotter, drier future.

Find More News

Subscribe for more updates