Feb. 29: Effects of police bias, fatigue, distraction discussed

just-mercyPULLMAN, Wash. – The implications of racial bias, fatigue and distracted driving on the police and communities they serve will be discussed at 5 p.m. Monday, Feb. 29, in CUE 203 at Washington State University as part of the free, public common reading lecture series.

The common reading book is “Just Mercy” by Bryan Stevenson. Learn more at http://CommonReading.wsu.edu.

Speakers Stephen James and Lois James are researchers in WSU’s Sleep and Performance Research Center in Spokane, Wash. Her research, funded by the Spokane Police Department, focuses on the dynamics of encounters between police officers and people in crisis.

The effects of fatigue, distracted driving and racial bias will be examined across a range of policing tasks – from deadly force judgement and decision making to patrol driving and tactical social interaction. The researchers will provide insight into what police departments do to safeguard against these effects.

 

Contacts:
Karen Weathermon, WSU common reading, 509-335-5488, weathermon@wsu.edu
Emma Epperly, WSU Undergraduate Education communications, 509-335-9458, emmaepperly@wsu.edu

 

 

Next Story

Smithsonian National Zoo nutritionist to deliver Halver Lecture Feb. 27

Mike Maslanka solves diet-related riddles in a world of exotic and threatened species. He will reflect on some of his greatest challenges and successes at the annual Halver Lecture in Comparative Nutrition, 5 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 27 in Pullman.

Recent News

AI research supports health equity in rural Washington

WSU sociologist Anna Zamora-Kapoor is studying how artificial intelligence and machine learning could help improve cancer survival outcomes among the Pacific Northwest’s rural Hispanic population.

Sustainability Task Force seeking community ideas

The new task force was formed as part of a broader effort to ensure the university is at the forefront of environmentally-conscious efforts in higher education.

Grant supports research on cross-laminated timber

WSU researchers have received a two‑year grant to make more resilient and durable housing materials from cross-laminated timber and recycled carbon fiber.