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WSU Everett launches interactive project to address racism

To mark Washington State University’s debut observing the National Day of Racial Healing, WSU Everett has launched an interactive project to help the community reflect on and learn how to break down systemic racism.

The EverCoug Anti-Racism Project challenges participants to think about the term “systemic racism,” and then share how they would eradicate systemic racism in just six words. The collected narrative will be displayed on campus digital screens as an ongoing exhibit, encouraging community engagement with anti-racism efforts.

“We hope members of our learning community not only think deeply about this issue but encourage friends, family, and colleagues to do the same,” said Lynne Varner, associate vice chancellor and chief of staff at WSU Everett. “Understanding and dismantling the vestiges of systemic racism requires input from all of us.”

The EverCoug Anti-Racism Project is part of a broader campus DEI initiative, which includes professional development training, speakers, and building learning communities centered around anti-racism mindfulness. The programs help foster healthy and respectful discussions around systemic racism and other complex topics. WSU Everett’s efforts aspire to transform communities by building the skills and assets needed to promote equity and well-being. 

All WSU students, faculty, staff, alums, and friends are welcome to participate in the EverCoug Anti-Racism Project. Join the conversation by sharing your thoughts.

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