WSU Vancouver releases 2009 edition of the Salmon Creek Journal

Vancouver  – WSU Vancouver announces the release of the 2009 edition of the Salmon Creek Journal. The release party will be held during the Art Fair on Friday April 10 from 3 – 5 p.m. in the Administration building, rooms 129 and 130. This event is free and open to the public. Free copies of the journal will be handed out.
 
The SCJ is a publication featuring blind juried works by students, faculty, staff, and alumni of WSU Vancouver representing three genres: prose, poetry and artwork. SCJ does not accept work previously published in magazines, journals, anthologies or ‘zines, in print or online.
 
Refreshments will be available and three $100 prizes awarded for each genre:
 
– For poetry, Joe Pitkin for “Office Poem”
– For visual arts, Michael Dunn for “American Falls-Niagara Falls”
– For prose, Byron Nalos for “Jackpot”
 
There will be a visual arts presentation and authors will read their work. The contributing authors and visual artists will take turns rotating through a book signing table and KOUG radio will broadcast live from the event.
 
For more information about this event or the journal visit,
http://www.vancouver.wsu.edu/ss/scj/party.html

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