Education abroad highlights global opportunities

The WSU Education Abroad Fair will be held on Tuesday, Jan. 22 in the Todd Atrium from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
 
Students in any field of study can find cost-effective programs to enhance their education and give a global perspective on their area of study. Visit the fair to talk with 25 study abroad program providers offering study and internship opportunities in more than 40 countries.

In addition, WSU faculty will be present to share information on summer and semester programs abroad. Faculty-led programs are growing in popularity and offer a unique opportunity for in-depth, field-based study.

Other opportunities for students include bilateral and ISEP exchanges. Exchanges are considered full immersion programs because students directly enroll and have access to full curriculum study. Staff will be available to answer questions about exchanges at the Education Abroad table at the fair.

Students are also eligible to win the Education Abroad raffle featuring Tony the Tiger as the grand prize. In addition, ten students will receive 50 percent off of the Education Abroad Application fee.

The Education Abroad Fair is a bi-annual event that allows students to speak directly with program providers, WSU faculty, and Education Abroad staff about study abroad opportunities.

Next Story

WORD Fellows applications open for spring cohort

Faculty system-wide are invited to apply to the Writing Occurring Rhetorically in the Disciplines program to learn ways to design more effective writing instruction.

Recent News

Announcing the search for a new provost

As WSU continues to evolve, the dual role of provost and Pullman campus chancellor is being divided into two separate positions.

The past is not that long ago

Washington State Magazine explores the complicated ties that continue to reverberate between the Pacific Northwest’s indigenous tribes and the first Jesuit priest to the region.

Aging societies more vulnerable to collapse

Societies and political structures, like the humans they serve, appear to become more fragile as they age, according to an analysis of hundreds of pre-modern societies.