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Saneholtz receives AFW leadership award

PULLMAN – Marcia Saneholtz, a retired WSU senior associate athletic director, was recently honored by the WSU Association for Faculty Women with the 2007 Samuel H. Smith Leadership Award.

The award honors an AFW member whose leadership has advanced the role of women at WSU and/or who has demonstrated leadership in her profession at the local, state, regional, national and/or international level.

Saneholtz has achieved national distinction for the major impact she has made on intercollegiate athletics and on women in sports.

The WSU volleyball team’s home court is now called Marcia Saneholtz Court in honor of her many contributions to athletics and gender equity, and she also has a WSU women’s Varsity 8 rowing shell named in her honor.

She is also the recipient of numerous other awards, including WSU Woman of Distinction in 2003.

Saneholtz retired in September 2007 after 28 years of service in the athletics administration.

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Kimmerer lecture Tuesday prompts luncheon, watch parties, museum booklet

WSU programs are hosting watch parties and other activities for students to engage in the common-reading virtual lecture by “Braiding Sweetgrass” author Robin Wall Kimmerer at 6 p.m. Tuesday evening.

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Kimmerer lecture Tuesday prompts luncheon, watch parties, museum booklet

WSU programs are hosting watch parties and other activities for students to engage in the common-reading virtual lecture by “Braiding Sweetgrass” author Robin Wall Kimmerer at 6 p.m. Tuesday evening.

Mourning the loss of Tyre Nichols

Washington State University System President Kirk Schulz released the following letter to the WSU community on Friday, Jan. 27 addressing the tragic death of Tyre Nichols earlier this month.

Forest debris could shelter huckleberry from climate change

WSU scientists are at work in Northwest forests, studying how fallen logs and other woodland debris could shelter the huckleberry from a hotter, drier future.

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