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Natural resource issues workshop Dec. 6-7

Managing change through consensus is the subject of a two-day WSU Extension workshop scheduled Dec. 6-7 at the Ellensburg Inn, Ellensburg.

The training will focus on natural resource issues.  Participants will experience activities designed to build capacity in developing consensus and collaborative decision-making, according to instructor, Don Nelson, WSU Extension beef specialist.

“The foundation for resolving these issues is based on building trust, relationships, mutual respect and effective communication as well as developing ownership in a shared vision of the desired future,” Nelson said.

He thinks the workshop should interest farmers, ranchers, natural resource managers, state and federal agency personnel, extension faculty, environmentalists, tribal members and others interested in the resolution of complex natural resource issues.

Nelson is nationally recognized for his capacity building efforts in the areas of consensus building, holistic decision-making and leadership development.

The workshop is scheduled from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on both days. Registration is $100 per person and will be limited to 30.  The registration deadline is Nov. 21. Contact Nelson at (509) 335-2922 or nelsond@wsu.edu for details.

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