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Thailand seeks WSU’s help in reshaping universities

Thailand has decided to privatize the universities in its higher education system and has turned to Washington State University to lead that effort.

Presidents of nine Thai universities will be at the Pullman campus May 12 – 19 for planning and brainstorming discussions with education faculty and university administrators, said WSU professor Forrest Parkay, project director. A group of Thai university vice presidents will continue the leadership institute until May 31.

Thai higher education has functioned as a centralized bureaucratic system, with universities owned by the government, Parkay explained. However, the Thai government has decided to renovate the system, with the goal of creating “autonomous” universities on the American model and reducing cronyism, mediocrity and red tape.

Parkay explained that WSU would be an executive-level professional development experience for the Thai educators who will then be able to provide national leadership in the privatization effort for all 75 institutions.

The project is funded by the U.S. Department of State. For more information click on the following link to the WSU UPAL Web site.

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