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WSU News Archives

6 inches of Mount St. Helens ash fell on Lind, Wash. — why?

Welcome to LindBy Linda Weiford, WSU News

LIND, Wash. – The day Mount St. Helens erupted, Gladie Nagamitsu vividly remembers when noon turned to midnight and the sky started raining down on the tiny farming town of Lind, Wash., where she lives. » More …

Innovative WSU approach ignites survey industry, earns national award

Don DillmanBy Alyssa Patrick, Office of Research

PULLMAN, Wash. – WSU researchers will receive a national award for designing a new survey method that is now used in censuses around the world. » More …

Junior faculty receive seed funding from WSU

planting seeds - new faculty seed grantsBy Alyssa Patrick, Office of Research

Nine junior faculty from across WSU colleges and campuses received New Faculty Seed Grants to kick-start development of their research, scholarly or creative portfolios. » More …

When science slides – wet weather sets off mudslides

Weathercatch Photo LogoBy Nic Loyd, WSU meteorologist, and Linda Weiford, WSU News

SPOKANE, Wash. – When it comes to precipitation, the Inland Northwest has really been dumped on. Look no further than the pot holes, soggy lawns and tattered rubber boots for proof.  And now — landslides. » More …

Why it was a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad winter

car buried in snow

By Nic Loyd, WSU meteorologist, and Linda Weiford, WSU News

What did the tree say after a long winter? What a re-leaf …

SPOKANE, Wash. – Never mind that March was among the wettest on record for the Inland Northwest. Our miserable winter is what still stands out. Just talking about it elicits grimaces and head shakes. » More …

Cider industry gains WSU Extension ally

By Scott Weybright, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

MOUNT VERNON, Wash. – Washington State University is helping bolster the surging hard cider industry with the hiring of Bri Ewing as a food and fermentation specialist at the Mount Vernon Research and Extension Center. » More …

State of emergency flooding – a perfect storm

By Nic Loyd, WSU meteorologist, and Linda Weiford, WSU News

SPOKANE, Wash. – As a warm sun hung over the Inland Northwest one day last week, it felt as though a giant lid had been yanked off the region. After a seemingly constant onslaught of rainy or drizzly days, the sky was blue, the temperature climbed to 60 degrees and we truly had a reason to enjoy being outside. » More …

Ask Dr. Universe: Why are plants green?

PUYALLUP, Wash. – A lush tropical rainforest, a field of sunflowers, a garden in your neighborhood. Our Earth is home to all kinds of plant life. From trees to catnip, there are thousands of different species of plants. Most of these plants are green, but not all of them. » More …

Potholes and the groundhog – what they share in common

By Nic Loyd, WSU meteorologist, and Linda Weiford, WSU News

SPOKANE, Wash. – How fitting that when the groundhog saw its shadow on Feb. 2, signaling six more weeks of winter, it would turn out to be February’s coldest day in the Spokane area. With a high of 27 degrees and a low of 9, he shivered in temperatures 14 degrees colder than normal. » More …