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New potato varieties chosen for McDonald’s fries
November 21, 2016

By Scott Weybright, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

potatoesPULLMAN, Wash. – When it comes to potatoes, french fries are the big outlet for Columbia Basin farmers. And when it comes to selling french fries, McDonald’s is the holy grail.

Want fries with that? Stealth potato virus threatens industry
July 13, 2016

By Sylvia Kantor, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – The next time you sink your teeth into a hot, crispy french fry, consider the threats that stand between you and this iconic food. Newly emerged viruses threaten the U.S. potato industry, including potatoes grown in Washington.

WSU receives $2.7 million to research costly potato threat
October 5, 2015

By Scott Weybright, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

potato-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Zebra chip disease, caused by a bacterium carried by insects, can ruin a potato crop; but little is known about where it comes from and how it can be avoided.

Feb. 27: Potato workshop highlights best practices, research
February 18, 2015

By Cathy McKenzie, WSU Mount Vernon

potatoMOUNT VERNON, Wash. – Diseases and weeds that afflict potatoes and best practices for growing them in western Washington are among the topics at a potato workshop 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 27, at the Washington State University Mount Vernon Research Center, 16650 State Route 536, Mount Vernon.

Scientists breed, release colorful new potato varieties
December 4, 2014

From Phys.org News

purple-potatoesPROSSER, Wash. – As the most-eaten U.S. vegetable, phytonutrient-rich potatoes can have a strong impact on health, according to plant geneticist Charles Brown, who is with Washington State University and the U.S. Agricultural Research Service in Prosser.

An unlikely collaboration harms potato crop
September 22, 2014

By Scott Weybright, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

Pappu-80PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have discovered that a common potato virus and a fungus-like pathogen can work together to damage the crop.