Skip to main content Skip to navigation
WSU News Agriculture

State of emergency flooding – a perfect storm

By Nic Loyd, WSU meteorologist, and Linda Weiford, WSU News

SPOKANE, Wash. – As a warm sun hung over the Inland Northwest one day last week, it felt as though a giant lid had been yanked off the region. After a seemingly constant onslaught of rainy or drizzly days, the sky was blue, the temperature climbed to 60 degrees and we truly had a reason to enjoy being outside. » More …

Master Gardeners honor Lowe’s store volunteers

By Seth Trucott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PASCO, Wash. – Staff from the Pasco Lowe’s store built and installed nearly 100 community garden beds to help feed local families, and the Master Gardeners of Benton and Franklin counties recently saluted their efforts with the 2016 Volunteer of the Year award. » More …

Ask Dr. Universe: Why are plants green?

PUYALLUP, Wash. – A lush tropical rainforest, a field of sunflowers, a garden in your neighborhood. Our Earth is home to all kinds of plant life. From trees to catnip, there are thousands of different species of plants. Most of these plants are green, but not all of them. » More …

Potholes and the groundhog – what they share in common

By Nic Loyd, WSU meteorologist, and Linda Weiford, WSU News

SPOKANE, Wash. – How fitting that when the groundhog saw its shadow on Feb. 2, signaling six more weeks of winter, it would turn out to be February’s coldest day in the Spokane area. With a high of 27 degrees and a low of 9, he shivered in temperatures 14 degrees colder than normal. » More …

March 21: Symphony of soil signals protects wheat health

By Seth Truscott, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – High-tech equipment that will help scientists improve wheat health will be introduced to the public at 9 a.m. Tuesday, March 21, at the Biotechnology-Life Sciences Building (BLS) room 402 at Washington State University. » More …

WSU looks for practices to thwart antimicrobial resistance

WSU postdoctoral fellow Mark Caudell with Imani Kanuga, a Maasai leader in Nadonjukin Village, Tanzania.

By Will Ferguson, College of Arts & Sciences

PULLMAN, Wash. – The death last year of a woman in Reno, Nev., from an infection resistant to every type of antibiotic available in the U.S. highlights how serious the threat of antimicrobial resistance has become. » More …

Fruit, nut exporter connects U.S. farms, China markets

By Hope Belli Tinney, Washington SBDC

TACOMA, Wash. – Farm Breeze International, a specialty crop export company headquartered in Tacoma, did $7.5 million in revenue in its first year selling tree nuts and fruit concentrate to China. In its second year, 2016, it shipped 15 million pounds of tree nuts and revenue more than tripled. » More …

Frosty beauty: Where there’s rime, there’s a reason

By Nic Loyd, WSU meteorologist, and Linda Weiford, WSU News

SPOKANE, Wash. – After emerging from one of the coldest Januarys on record, including a so-called “Snowmageddon,” many of us have had it up to our ears with shoveling snow, slipping on icy sidewalks, driving through freezing fog and enduring frigid temperatures. Even our recent warmer weather and rainfalls can’t offset all the nippy days we’ve encountered. » More …