This is the second in a series of articles highlighting new faculty members from each college at Washington State University.

Destiny may have brought Kelsey Pascoe to Washington State University’s College of Nursing.

A passion for equity in patient care is motivating her to dive into research and invest in the University’s land grant mission.

Pascoe’s mother, Anne Hirsch, was an associate dean at the College and her father Steve was a faculty member in the school psychology program at WSU Spokane. Pascoe joined the faculty at WSU Vancouver in August, eager to mentor students and delve into social justice as it relates to health care.

“In nursing school I loved working with patients, but I had a desire to teach,” Pascoe said. “I’ve felt like I had something to teach the world since I was 7. I feel like it’s a way I can have more of an impact on the field of nursing, to help build a workforce of nurses that treat everyone like family.”

Pascoe is particularly passionate about healthcare for populations that are often underserved. Her position at WSU offers her the chance to conduct research into improving healthcare service for current and formerly incarcerated individuals.

“I’d like to establish myself as an expert on understanding the impact of prisons on the communities around them,” Pascoe said. “I think we often miss the big picture of incarceration and focus on the individual rather than recognizing that every individual plays a role in our community.”

In addition to her research, Pascoe relishes her time with students. She’s previously taught at Pacific Lutheran University and University of Washington-Tacoma. Pascoe says connecting with students is valuable in many ways.

“Collaborating with students is my favorite part of being a professor,” Pascoe said. “They tell me their passions we talk about how they might look for connections in their fields. When I’m lecturing I try to establish a collaborative atmosphere. I think the best learning environment is one where everyone can contribute.”