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Native American students coming to WSU Spokane for early health care career training

student taking the blood pressure of another student
Na-ha-shnee 2017 activities focus on health sciences. Photo by Cori Kogan WSU Spokane

SPOKANE, Wash. – Twenty-five Native American high school students from Washington, Idaho, Oregon, New Mexico and Utah will attend the 23rd Annual Na-ha-shnee Native American Health Science Institute at WSU Spokane, June 18-29.

Included in the 25 students are attendees from Rogers, Ferris, North Central, Cheney and Mead high schools. Attendees are heading into their sophomore, junior or senior years of high school and plan to pursue health careers.

This year, WSU Spokane has partnered with Spokane Public Schools’ NEWTECH Skills Center. The students will be eligible to receive Career and Technical Education credits for 65 of the instructional hours during Na-ha-shnee.

During the 11-day event, students will learn about a wide range of health sciences topics and receive college admissions information.

The health sciences topics include anatomy training with the Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine, basic nursing skills training and simulation experience with the College of Nursing, and a visit to the College of Pharmacy’s compounding lab.

The Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine also will conduct a workshop on integrated traditional and western medicine from a family medicine doctor.

Students also will:

  • Receive CPR and First Aid Certification.
  • Visit research labs, including the Sleep and Performance Research Center on campus.
  • Take a day trip to the Kalispel Tribe’s Camas Path North Wellness Center.
  • Learn from Eastern Washington University’s dental hygiene, occupational therapy and physical therapy programs, as well as Gonzaga University’s bacteriophage lab.

The Na-ha-shnee Native American Health Science Institute is made possible thanks to the following sponsors: The David and Dorothy Pierce Trust, Eastern Washington Area Health Education Center, the Kalispel Charitable Fund, the Lummi Indian Tribe, the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe, Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, STCU, the Tulalip Tribes and Wells Fargo.

For more information, see the Na-ha-shnee Health Science Institute website.

 

Contacts:

  • Emma Noyes, WSU Native American Health Sciences, camp director, 509-324-7215, noyes@wsu.edu
  • Kevin Dudley, communications, WSU Spokane, 509-358-7528, kevin_dudley@wsu.edu

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