Organic produce available from WSU starting May 27

By Scott Weybright, College of Agricultural, Human & Natural Resource Sciences

radishes-webPULLMAN, Wash. – The Eggert Family Organic Farm at Washington State University will hold its first farm sale of the season 3-6 p.m. Friday, May 27. The farm is located on Animal Sciences Road, just off Terra View Road, and directly behind the WSU Bear Center near Grimes Way.

Rhubarb, lettuce, spinach, kale, arugula, radishes and tomato plants will be for sale. Sales will continue at the farm during the same hours every Friday through late October.

In a change from the last six years, the farm will not be at the mid-week Pullman Farmer’s Market.

rhubarb-web
Rhubarb at the organic farm at WSU.

“We’d like the community to come out and explore our farm,” said farm manager Brad Jaeckel. “We’re here to answer questions and let people know how their food is grown.”

As the season progresses, the farm will sell a variety of berries in addition to mainstays like tomatoes, garlic and other fruits and vegetables. Cut flowers will be available in the u-pick garden.

In coming years, once fruit trees mature, a variety of tree fruits will be available for sale.

“We’re getting more established,” Jaeckel said of the farm, now in its third season. “Everything is just a little further along and growing well.”

The farm also features a community supported agriculture program, though it is sold out for the 2016 season.

 

 

Contact:
Bradley Jaeckel, WSU Eggert Family Organic Farm manager, 509-335-5893, jaeckel@wsu.edu

 

 

Next Story

Smithsonian National Zoo nutritionist to deliver Halver Lecture Feb. 27

Mike Maslanka solves diet-related riddles in a world of exotic and threatened species. He will reflect on some of his greatest challenges and successes at the annual Halver Lecture in Comparative Nutrition, 5 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 27 in Pullman.

Recent News

AI research supports health equity in rural Washington

WSU sociologist Anna Zamora-Kapoor is studying how artificial intelligence and machine learning could help improve cancer survival outcomes among the Pacific Northwest’s rural Hispanic population.

Sustainability Task Force seeking community ideas

The new task force was formed as part of a broader effort to ensure the university is at the forefront of environmentally-conscious efforts in higher education.

Grant supports research on cross-laminated timber

WSU researchers have received a two‑year grant to make more resilient and durable housing materials from cross-laminated timber and recycled carbon fiber.