May 17-18: Workshop helps communities lessen wildfire risk

firewiseAIRWAY HEIGHTS, Wash. – A free workshop about fire behavior and community organizing to defend against wildfires will be Tuesday and Wednesday, May 17-18, at the Enduris Training Facility in Airway Heights. The address is 1610 S. Technology Blvd., Spokane, Wash.

Hosted by Washington State University Extension, the training is part of the federal Firewise communities program, which encourages neighbors to work together to prevent wildfire losses and attain recognition as a Firewise community.

Lunch is provided both days. The first 20 registrants will receive a free overnight stay at the nearby Ramada Spokane Airport Hotel. Register at http://ext100.wsu.edu/spokane/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2016/03/Firewise_Forestry_16.pdf.

“This program is one of our best tools for empowering people to guard against the threat of fire to communities,” said Steve McConnell, WSU regional extension forestry specialist. “Numerous Firewise communities have been created in the aftermath of these workshops.”

2015 was the worst fire year in Washington: Three firefighters died, more than a million acres burned, hundreds of homes were destroyed and smoke choked eastern Washington for weeks. More than a million people live in fire-prone forests in Washington.

The workshop is supported by WSU Extension, the state Department of Natural Resources and the Spokane Conservation District.

 

Contact:
Steve McConnell, WSU Extension forestry, 509-477-2175, steven.mcconnell@wsu.edu

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