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WSU student innovation on display April 29

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University students from across the state will show off their knowledge, skills and innovation at the Engineering Capstone Expo on Friday, April 29.

WHY: Capstone design courses are prominent elements of the nation’s top engineering degree programs and are central to the development and assessment of graduating quality professional engineers.

WHAT: 100+ projects from students in the WSU Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture from across the state.

WHEN: 8:30-11:30 a.m. Friday, April 29.

WHERE: Compton Union Building (CUB) senior ballroom, WSU Pullman.

Voiland College is known for producing highly regarded “work-ready, day-one” graduates and is a world leader in research and scholarship aimed at providing solutions to today’s energy, environment, health and technology challenges.

The expo is sponsored by the Harold Frank Engineering Entrepreneurship Institute at WSU.

 

Contact:
John Schneider, WSU Voiland College associate dean for undergraduate programs, 509-335-0348, john_schneider@wsu.edu

 

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