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More than a machine: Veterinary MRI is a life saver

dog upsidedown in mriPULLMAN, Wash. – After noticing an odd lump on his dog’s head in the spring of 2013, Joel Greenhalgh of British Columbia, Canada took Mr. Bear, a then 11-year-old Australian Shepherd-Rottweiler mix, to his local veterinarian. 

At first the advice was to watch and see, but when it didn’t go away, his veterinarian took a biopsy. Mr. Bear had cancer.

The Canadian oncologist referred Mr. Bear to WSU. Neurologist Dr. Annie Chen and veterinary student Beryl Swanson at the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital, examined Mr. Bear and got him in right away for an MRI.

The WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital is the only place in the Pacific Northwest and western Canada that offers high-field MRI that can accurately diagnose patients large and small. The nearest comparable MRI machine is more than 800 miles away from Pullman. WSU Vetmed website.

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Third-year pharmacy student Ghazal Meratnia does not particularly enjoy the spotlight. She likes to keep things low key, but in many ways she’s an everyday hero for hundreds of Afghan refugees living in Washington state.

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Pharmacy student helps hundreds of Afghan refugees in Washington

Third-year pharmacy student Ghazal Meratnia does not particularly enjoy the spotlight. She likes to keep things low key, but in many ways she’s an everyday hero for hundreds of Afghan refugees living in Washington state.

Leadership changes in the Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture

Xianming Shi is the new chair of civil and environmental engineering, while Haluk Beyenal will serve as associate dean of research and graduate studies. Dave Field is the new director for the Institute of Materials Research.

Scientists urge preparation for catastrophic climate change

Although unlikely, climate change catastrophes, including human extinction, should be more heavily considered by scientists, according to a new commentary article coauthored by WSU archaeologist Tim Kohler.

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