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Area recycles, cleans – even hunts eggs

PULLMAN –Look no further than WSU staff and faculty working in the Food Science/Human Nutrition Building (FSHN) for Cougar Pride Days spirit.
 
Their spirited actions during Cougar Pride Days, April 6-12, ranged from inside and outside clean-up, flower purchasing and planting, a lunch with a surprise egg hunt and recycling education.
 
Barb Smith, Department of Entomology administrative manager, said the buildings’ activities included:
 
• Carlie Hochsprung leading an April 9 clean-up outside Hulbert Hall.
 
• Outside clean-ups on April 10 of the FSNH north and west sides led by Carolee Armfield and south and east sides led by Smith.
 
• Planting petunia flowers outside Hulbert and FSHN. The flowers were purchased thanks to $165 personally donated by staff and faculty working in FSHN.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
• An April 10 FSHN Cougar Pride Days lunch featuring hotdogs and homemade chili provided by Smith and Dr. Richard Zack of Entomology with the WSU Entomology Club supplying water and soda and the Food Science Department donating Ferdinand’s ice cream. After lunch, a surprise egg hunt took place. Inside plastic eggs were candy and Ferdinand’s certificates for a scoop of ice cream.
 
• Borrowing an informative recycling wheel and using it to educate those attending the lunch on recycling and along with  showing them items that are recyclable and that are used in the building.

 

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